Archive for the ‘Chess’ Category

Grischuk, Nepomniachtchi, Nakamura Advance In FIDE Grand Prix

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2019

Alexander Grischuk, Ian Nepomniachtchi and Hikaru Nakamura won their tiebreaks today and qualified for the third round of the FIDE Grand Prix in Moscow.
Tomorrow, Nepomniachtchi will play a match against Radoslaw Wojtaszek, and Gr…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Semifinalists Set in Moscow After High-Tension Day of Playoffs

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2019

s Round 2 tb 03
Three
semi-finalists were decided Wednesday in the Moscow Grand Prix as Hikaru Nakamura of the United States and Ian Nepomniachtchi and Alexander Grischuk, both of Russia, advanced from the quarterfinals after prevailing in rapid tie-breaker games. They join Radoslaw Wojtaszek of Poland who won his quarterfinal match on Tuesday.

That was necessary for three of the quarterfinal matches after the regulation games were drawn.

Nakaumura, who faced Daniil Dubov of Russia, took control of his tie-breaker by winning the first game, even though he had Black. The opening was a Classical English, with Dubov essaying 8 b3, which is a bit unusual. Nakamura had little trouble equalizing and even managed to obtain the bishop pair. The game seemed most likely to end in a draw until Dubov inadvisedly grabbed Nakamura’s pawn on d5, trapping his rook. Nakamura was able to win the rook for a bishop and then gradually outplayed Dubov in a long endgame.

In the second game, Dubov faced a must-win situation, but it was Nakamura who established an edge out of the opening. He eventually won an exchange and then forced an endgame where he was clearly better. Though Nakamura could probably have won if he wanted to, he was content to force a draw by repeating the position as that clinched the match.

Nepomniachtchi was paired against Wei Yi of China. Game 1 was exciting as Nepomniachtchi, who had Black, chose to defend the Poison Pawn Variation, which has been heavily analyzed and is very complex. After a forcing sequence of moves, the players simplified to an ending in which Wei was a little bit better. Nepomniachtchi pressed too hard and eventually lost his one piece for several pawns, but they were disconnected and seemingly easy targets. The one factor weighing in Nepomniachtchi’s favor was that he had more time on his clock. Wei slowly increased his advantage until Move 44, when he erred, costing him his edge. Nepomniachtchi was able to win Wei’s bishop for a passed pawn, after which the players agreed to a draw.

In Game 2, Wei chose an inferior version of the Caro-Kann Defense. By Move 20, he was already under pressure when he blundered with 20 … f6, overlooking Nepomniachtchi’s clever reply – 21 h4! Suddenly, Wei could not avoid the loss of a significant amount of material. He chose to give up his queen for a rook and a knight, but Black had too many weak pawns and Nepomniachtchi was able to force resignation after 45 moves.

In the third playoff, Grischuk had Black in Game 1 against Wesley So of the United States. The opening was the Sveshnikov or Pelikan Variation in the Sicilian Defense. Grischuk built up his forces on the kingside while So concentrated on the queenside, attacking Grischuk’s weak pawns. So managed to win those pawns, but only by allowing Grischuk’s attack to become very menacing. Just when it seemed that Grischuk was ready to break through, he allowed a perpetual attack on his queen, ending the game as a draw. If, instead of 27 … Qc5 he had played 27 … Qe7, the computer engines evaluated the position as very much in Black’s favor.

In Game 2, Grischuk obtained a clear edge out of the opening as he was able to break apart So’s pawns. So defended admirably for quite a while, but, eventually, the pawn weaknesses were simply too much. On his 42nd move, Grischuk won a pawn and eventually achieved a winning rook-and-pawn ending after a few inaccuracies by So.

In an interview afterward, Grischuk was not too happy with his play in either game, saying, “My technique was 50 percent of Magnus [Carlsen], which was enough.”

The semifinals begin at 3 PM local time on Thursday. The broadcast can be viewed free and live at worldchess.com.

Nakamura will face Grischuk, while Wojtaszek plays Nepomniachtchi.

Report Dylan Loeb McClain.

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Firouzja Crushes Martinez In Junior Speed Chess Match

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2019

Alireza Firouzja was the clear favorite, and he proved it. The Iranian rising star crushed José Martinez of Peru 18-7 in the second Junior Speed Chess Championship match, on Tuesday.
As the current number two in the Chess.com bullet …

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Firouzja Crushes Martinez In 1st Junior Speed Chess Match

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2019

Alireza Firouzja was the clear favorite, and he proved it. The Iranian rising star crushed José Martinez of Peru 18-7 in the second Junior Speed Chess Championship match, on Tuesday.
As the current number two in the Chess.com bullet …

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Women’s Speed Chess Championship Takes Off Today With Lagno-Danielian

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2019

The inaugural Chess.com Women' Speed Chess Championship starts today, with the first quarterfinals matchup between GM Kateryna Lagno (Russia) and GM Elina Danielian (Armenia). 
We've had two matches in the Junior Speed Chess …

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Wojtaszek Is First Semifinalist in Moscow, the Rest Will Be Decided in Playoffs

Tuesday, May 21st, 2019

s Round 2 game 2 00
Radoslaw Wojtaszek is the first player to advance to the semifinals of the Moscow Grand Prix after he beat Peter Svidler on Tuesday. The other semifinalists will be decided on Wednesday in playoffs
as the rest of the quarterfinal matches ended in ties after all the games were drawn.

All the games on the first day of the quarterfinals on Monday were drawn, so any victory Tuesday would clinch a match. Wojtaszek, who is from Poland, was the only player to break through.

He had White against Svidler, who is from Russia. By transposition, the opening became a Benoni, which is not thought to be very good for Black, but is ultra-sharp and certainly offers both sides many possibilities.

Svidler consumed more time on the clock in the opening, but he achieved a reasonable position after 20 moves. The question was: how should each side continue?

At Move 25, Svidler took a calculated risk: He sacrificed an exchange (rook for bishop) plus a pawn to put Wojtaszek’s centre under pressure. It seemed like a reasonable decision, despite the stakes, but Wojtaszek found the best moves, particularly 2 Rf3!, and Svidler was gradually driven back.

Wojtaszek eventually won a queen for a rook and, after that, it was only a matter of mopping up. Svidler resigned after 42 moves.

In an interview afterward, Svidler pinpointed 27 … Bd4 as the critical mistake.

Though none of the other games was decisive, they were hard fought.

The longest game of the day was between Wesley So of the United States and Alexander Grischuk of Russia. So, who had White, opened with 1 e4 and Grischuk replied with the Sicilian Defense, 1 … c5. The game went down the path of the Sveshnikov or Pelikan Variation, which is known to be a very solid defense for Black. So managed to win Black’s backward d pawn on Move 21, but it allowed Black to simplify the position and achieve activity for his remaining pieces. The players continued to Move 69, long after there were any reasonable winning chances.

The game between Ian Nepomniachtchi of Russia and Wei Yi of China went nearly as long – 68 moves – but Nepomniachtchi had slightly better winning chances than So had. The opening was an Open Ruy Lopez in which Wei had two pawns (his b and d pawns) that were a little lose and hard to defend. Nepomniachtchi managed to win one of them, but only by allowing doubled b pawns and some exchanges of pieces. After that, with accurate defense, Wei was able to hold on.

The other game, between Daniil Dubov of Russia and Hikaru Nakamura of the United States, was a Catalan, with Dubov handling the White pieces. Though there are many tricky variations in the Catalan, the opening has been very heavily analyzed and it is hard to surprise anyone at the top level these days. Nakamura had little trouble equalizing chances and the game was drawn in a largely symmetrical position after 32 moves.

The playoffs begin Wednesday with the rapid games at 3 PM local time. The broadcast can be viewed free and live at worldchess.com.
Given the high caliber of the players, there are no real favorites in any match.

Report by Dylan Loeb McClain

Round 2, game 2 results:
Dubov – Nakamura 1/2-1/2
Grischuk – So 1/2-1/2
Wei Yi – Nepomniachtchi 1/2-1/2
Svidler – Wojtaszek 0-1

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Wojtaszek Knocks Out Svidler From FIDE Moscow Grand Prix

Tuesday, May 21st, 2019

After kicking out Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, Radoslaw Wojtaszek also eliminated Peter Svidler from the FIDE Grand Prix in Moscow. The other three quarterfinal matches went into tiebreaks.
There was little excitement on the first day of the…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Challenging world chess champion Magnus Carlsen

Tuesday, May 21st, 2019

Norway is enjoying a boom in chess playing following the success of the country’s Magnus Carlsen in the World Chess Championships. The Travel Show’s Mike Corey went to meet him for a rare TV interview and challenged him to a game of chess. Did Mike really have a chance of beating the chess champion?

Source: GameKnot online chess news

Chess Prodigy Firouzja Faces Martinez In Junior Speed Chess Tuesday

Monday, May 20th, 2019

After the thrilling season opener Van Foreest-Tari, the Junior Speed Chess Championship continues tomorrow with the Iranian rising star Alireza Firouzja playing the Peruvian talent José Martinez.
You can watch Firouzja-Martinez …

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

World Fischer Random Championship: Qualified Players

Monday, May 20th, 2019

Below is the full list of non-titled players who've qualified for the first ever Fischer Random World Chess Championship.
There is still time to register and be a part of chess history! 
Sixteen Fischer Random Qualifier events will take p…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

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