Archive for September, 2019

World Cup: Round 3 kicks off in Khanty-Mansiysk

Monday, September 16th, 2019

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The starting games of the Round 3 of FIDE World Cup were played in the Ugra Chess Academy on September 16. Seven encounters ended with a victory for one side.

The biggest upset of the day was Kirill Alekseenko’s (Russia) beating the higher-rated Pentala Harikrishna (India). The Russian GM broke through on the queenside and despite Black’s counterplay in the center infiltrated with his rooks into the opponent’s camp and took total control over the position.

Alexander Grischuk (Russia) defeated Xu Xiangyu (China) demonstrating superior calculation of variations in a very complicated position. It should be noted though, that after 24…Be7? he could have found himself on the brink of defeat. Alexander confessed that in the variation 25. Rxh7+ Bxh7 26. Nxh7 Qxh7 he completely missed 27.Qe4! with a decisive advantage for White. Luckily for the Russian GM, the Chinese player opted for 25. Qc6? which left him high and dry. 

Teimour Radjabov (Azerbaijan) obtained a very comfortable position in his encounter with  Daniil Yuffa (Russia) and despite an early queen exchange shattered Black’s defense combining the threats on both wings.

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (Azerbaijan) bested his compatriot Eltaj Safarli although the capitulation of the latter in the final position looks premature.

Dmitry Andreikin (Russia) was very close to equality in his game with Jan-Krzysztof Duda (Poland) but several inaccuracies snowballed into a disaster in a four-rook endgame.

Nikita Vitiugov (Russia) won one of the most important games in his chess career, beating Sergey Karjakin (Russia). “Sergey was defeating solidly, and after the time control, it seemed to me that the biggest part of my advantage has disappeared,” said Nikita in a post-game interview. “However, Black’s problems were bigger than they seemed at first sight. I am not sure about his decision to take a pawn on b3, maybe he could just stay. After the capture, it is sad for Black.”

If Vitiugov makes a draw in the second game of the match against Karjakin, he will at least repeat his best result at the World Cups so far (Round 4 in 2009).

Welsey So (USA) “squeezed water from a stone” winning a drawish rook endgame against Santosh Vidit (India).

Other games – Tomashevsky – Nepomniachtchi, Jakovenko – Vachier-Lagrave, Ding Liren – Firouzja, Aronian – Matlakov, Dominguez – Wang Hao, Yu Yangyi – Wei Yi, Le Quang Liem – Artemiev, Giri – Xiong, and Nisipeanu – Svidler – ended peacefully.

The second games of the third round with the colors reversed will be played on Tuesday, September 17.

Photos 

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The competition is organized by the Government of Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug – Ugra, International Chess Federation (FIDE), Ugra Chess Federation, and Ministry of Sports of the Russian Federation.

Official website: https://khantymansiysk2019.fide.com/en/
General partner – Gazpromneft-Khantos LCC.
Official airline – Utair.
Official partners of the competition: OJSC RostelecomUgra Chess AcademyRussian Chess FederationAB InBev Efes and PJSC Rosneft.
FIDE official partner – JSCo “RZD”.
General media partner – News Agency TASS.
Media partners – Match TVWorld of Chess social network, OTRC “Ugra”Ugra-news.ru News of Ugra regional newspaper, AIF-Ugra newspaper.

 

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Champions Crowned in World Youth Rapid and Blitz

Monday, September 16th, 2019

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FIDE World Youth Rapid and Blitz Championships (under 14, 16 and 18 years old categories) finished in Salobrena, Spain. 178 players from 22 countries, including 1 GM, 5 IMs, 12 FMs, 1 WIM, 12 WFMs participated in the chess forum in Granada. After three days of intense battles, we have all twelve champions.

Final results of the World Junior rapid championships in Salobrena (11 – 12 September 2019):

Winner U-14 Girls: Thien Ngan Nguyen (Vietnam)

Winner U-14 Open: Aspet Tadevosyan (Spain)

Winner U-16 Open: Pedro Antonio Gines Esteo (Spain)

Winner U-16 Girls: Cecilia Guillo Longares (Spain)

Winner U-18 Open: Lucas Van Foreest (Netherlands)

Winner U-18 Girls: Honorata Kucharska (Poland)

Final results of the World Junior blitz championships in Salobrena (13 September 2019):

Winner U-14 Open: Pham Thien Phuc Vo (Vietnam)

Winner U-14 Girls: Thien Ngan Nguyen (Vietnam)

Winner U-16 Open: Dominik Horvath (Austria)

Winner U-16 Girls: Ngoc Thuy Duong Bach (Vietnam)

Winner U-18 Open: Lucas Van Foreest (Netherlands)

Winner U-18 Girls: Kamila Hryshchenko (Ukraine)

18-years-old Dutch grandmaster Lucas van Foreest celebrates double success winning both rapid and blitz world championships under 18.

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He comes from the famous Van Foreest chess family: his brother Jorden won the 2016 Dutch Championship, and both his great-great-grandfather Arnold and great-great-granduncle Dirk were three-time Dutch Champions. It has been a very good year for Lukas so far – earlier in July he won the national championship and is now a part of the Dutch national team together with such grandmasters as Anish Giri and Erwin L’Ami. We will see him in action at the European Team Championship in Georgia in October.

“I feel quite relieved, happy. I played such tournaments for the first time in my life. I came here to win,” said Lucas in an interview given to his compatriot Sergey Tiviakov.

The closing ceremony included speeches delivered by FIDE Deputy President GM Bachar Kouatly and President of the Spanish Chess Federation Javier Ochoa, vibrant Flamenco dances by local artists and presentation of awards to all the winners. 

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Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

FIDE Chess World Cup: Giri Through In Armageddon

Monday, September 16th, 2019

Anish Giri played the longest tiebreak and eventually defeated Evgenyi Najer in the armageddon game. The third round of the FIDE World Cup starts on Monday.
You can follow the games here as part of our live portal Chess.com/events. The…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

A miracle save allows Gunina to keep pace with Ju Wenjun

Monday, September 16th, 2019

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The first game to come to an end was the clash between Elisabeth Paethz (2479) and the tournament co-leader Ju Wenjun (2576). The World Champion went for a Petrov defence, and some early exchanges quickly lead to a dull position, in which the players found no better option than a threefold repetition on move 23. The German IM seemed to be particularly unsatisfied with the outcome of the game (her fifth consecutive draw in the tournament), while Ju Wenjun took it as a good result: the top-seeded is playing quite solid, avoiding unnecessary risks in the tournament.

A much more dramatic turn took the game of the other co-leader, Valentina Gunina (2502), against the former World Champion Antoaneta Stefanova (2491). The Russian Grandmaster went wrong in the opening and soon found herself under the fire of heavy artillery. Her King was cornered in the open h-file, and it looked like if she was about to get checkmated in spectacular fashion. In a hopeless situation, Gunina found the most aggressive ways to complicate the position. Stefanova started to consume lots of time in her moves, so much so that this was the last game to finish. With a rook down and thanks to her opponent’s time trouble, Gunina found a way to save the game with perpetual check. She added half-point to her score and with 3,5 points she managed to keep pace with Ju Wenjun.

The only decisive game of the round five was the victory of Kateryna Lagno (2545) over Pia Cramling (2487). In a Rauzer Variation pieces were quickly traded, and the position came down to an endgame with one rook and knight per side. Lagno had a majority of pawns on the queenside, but it looked completely equal until Cramling blundered with 36…Nc6. A simple tactic left Kateryna with two connected passed pawns, that eventually costed Pia her knight, and the game.

Indian number one female player Humpy Koneru (2560) made a short draw with the World Championship Challenger, and this Women’s Grand Prix youngest participant, Aleksandra Goryachkina (2564). It was a Slav Defense with symmetrical pawn structure, the rooks were quickly traded in the open c-file, and a draw was agreed on move 27.

Harika Dronavalli (2503) achieved a significant advantage in a Scotch Game against former World Champion Alexandra Kosteniuk (2495). Harika tried to convert the positional edge into a material advantage, but Kosteniuk’s energetic counterplay forced a massive piece exchange. Players agreed on a draw with only rooks, opposite colour bishops, and three pawns each in the kingside.

The Classical Variation of the Petrov’s Defense was played between Marie Sebag (2450) and Alina Kashlinskaya (2487). Both opponents chose a risk-free approach, and the game ended with a draw on move 27.

Standings after 5 rounds:

1
 Gunina, Valentina
3? 2502 
2
 Ju, Wenjun
3? 2576 
3
 Goryachkina, Aleksandra
3 2564 
4
 Koneru, Humpy
3 2560 
5
 Lagno, Kateryna
3 2545 
6
 Harika, Dronavalli
2? 2503 
7
 Paehtz, Elisabeth
2? 2479 
8
 Kashlinskaya, Alina
2 2487 
9
 Kosteniuk, Alexandra
2 2495 
10
 Stefanova, Antoaneta
2 2491 
11
 Cramling, Pia
1? 2487 
12
 Sebag, Marie
1? 2450 

The sixth-round games will be played on September 16, at 3 pm local time (GMT +3).

Spectators can follow the games with English and Russian commentaries: www.youtube.com/fidechannel

Official website: https://wgp2019.fide.com

A gallery with photos in high resolution is at the disposal of the press on the official FIDE Flickr account.

Text: Keti Tsatsalashvili
Photos: David Llada

m 20190915 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R05-19-2 venuem 20190915 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R05-38-2 Ju Wenjun Elisabeth Paehtzm 20190915 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R05-109 Marie Sebag Alina Kashlinskaya RUSSIA FRANCEm 20190915 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R05-199 venue
m 20190915 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R05-10 Keti Tsatsalashvili Elisabeth Paehtz
m 20190915 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R05-59 Valentina Gunina RUSSIA
m 20190915 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R05-80 Kateryna Lagno RUSSIA

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Second Round of the World Cup is over

Sunday, September 15th, 2019

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Tie-breaks of the Second Round of the FIDE World Cup were played on September 15 in Khanty-Mansiysk.

An overwhelming majority of matches ended after rapid chess games.

Eltaj Safarli (Azerbaijan) defeated Nihal Sarin (India), Lenier Dominguez (USA) beat Nijat Abasov (Azerbaijan), Jeffrey Xiong (USA) proved stronger than Amin Tabatabaei (Iran), Yu Yangyi (China) outplayed Baskaran Adhiban (India), Maxim Matlakov (Russia) defeated Boris Gelfand (Israel), Peter Svidler (Russia) knocked out his compatriot Andrey Esipenko, Alexander Grischuk (Russia) defeated Benjamin Bok (Netherlands), Ding Liren (China) bested Sergei Movsesian (Armenia), Kirill Alekseenko (Russia) won against Johan-Sebastian Christiansen (Norway), Dmitry Jakovenko (Russia) defeated Gawain Jones (England), Nikita Vitiugov (Russia) passed Niclas Huschenbeth (Germany), Sanan Sjugirov (Russia) lost to Teimour Radjabov (Azerbaijan), and David Anton Guijarro (Spain) lost to Wei Yi (China).

Giri-Najer and McShane-Yuffa matches were much closer.

Luke McShane (England) and Daniil Yuffa (Russia) exchanged blows first in rapid chess, then in 10+10 games. In blitz, however, the Russian won both games and advanced to the Third Round. One should note that in both starting rounds Daniil Yuffa was a big underdog, judging by ratings, and his performance is nothing short of sensational.

Anish Giri (Netherlands) and Evgeniy Najer (Russia) finished their first four rapid games peacefully. The 5-minute blitz match started with Giri’s victory, but Najer managed to come back in the second game, brining the match to an Armageddon. In the sudden death game Anish Giri got the black pieces, won the game outright and advanced to the Third Round of the World Cup.

The first games of the Third Round will be played on September 16.

Pairings

Photos

Videos 

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The competition is organized by the Government of Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous Okrug – Ugra, International Chess Federation (FIDE), Ugra Chess Federation, and Ministry of Sports of the Russian Federation.

General partner – Gazpromneft-Khantos LCC.

Official airline – Utair.

Official partners of the competition: OJSC RostelecomUgra Chess AcademyRussian Chess FederationAB InBev Efes and PJSC Rosneft.

FIDE official partner – JSCo “RZD”.

General media partner – News Agency TASS.


OFFICIAL WEBSITE


Text by Eteri Kublashvili

Photos by Kirill Merkuryev

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Chess : Michael Adams knocked out in first round of World Cup in Siberia

Sunday, September 15th, 2019

The seven-times British chess champion Michael Adams was eliminated 4.5-3.5 after an eight-game marathon in the first round of the $1.6m World Cup on Thursday as the Cornishman, 47, was gradually worn down after seven consecutive draws by 19-year-old Chithambaram Aravindh, one of the many emerging chess talents from India. It was a bitter defeat for the longtime England No 1, who in his peak years had some of his best results in this prestigious knockout event and even reached the final in 2005 when it counted as the global body Fide’s official world chess championship. The 128-player biennial World Cup is one of the major competitions in chess. An extra incentive for its two finalists is that both will qualify among the eight candidates contending to become Magnus Carlsen’s next world title challenger. Carlsen himself took part in the 2017 World Chess Cup, when …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

On Chess : Champions Showdown Provided Exciting And Unpredictable Games

Sunday, September 15th, 2019

While none of the matches truly went down to the wire, the players did an excellent job of entertaining the audience with exciting games from Sept. 3 through Sept. 5. Garry Kasparov may have been out of the match since Day 3, but he continued to fight admirably and picked up some nice wins for his efforts. Wesley So clinched his match with a draw in the first game, then proceeded to continue dominating his match against Veselin Topalov. Peter Svidler officially won his match by holding a long endgame against Leinier Dominguez. Levon Aronian couldn’t slow down the momentum of U.S. chess champion Hikaru Nakamura, and the American finished off the match two rounds before the end of the tournament. Let’s take a look at the final results and see what happened in each …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

Nakamura Eliminated From FIDE Chess World Cup

Sunday, September 15th, 2019

Hikaru Nakamura got eliminated from the FIDE World Cup after failing to win his return game with Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu. The Chinese GM Xu Yiangyu surprised again by knocking out Ernesto Inarkiev while Alireza Firouzja played a…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Ju Wenjun wins and joins Gunina in the lead

Sunday, September 15th, 2019

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The tournament leader Valentina Gunina (2502) was very close to biting the dust in her game against the veteran Pia Cramling (2487). Loyal to her style, the Russian jumped into some sharp tactical skirmishes as soon as she had the chance, but the complications didn’t yield her any gain. Quite the opposite, when the dust settled it was the Swede who had a clear advantage, and she appeared headed for her first victory in the tournament. However, short of time, Cramling didn’t manage to crack Black defences and, when the time trouble got serious, she decided to go for a threefold repetition to secure half a point.

A Modern variation of the Slav Defence was played in the game between Ju Wenjun (2576) and Marie Sebag (2450). Sebag lost the thread right after the opening, allowing Ju Wenjun’s cavalry to infiltrate her position. By move 20, the position of the French Grandmaster was already very delicate, and the World Champion gave her no chance. This victory allows the Chinese to catch up with Gunina, with 3/4.

The other decisive game of the round was the fantastic victory of Alina Kashlinskaya (2487) over Harika Dronavalli (2503). In a Pirc Defence, white quickly traded the queens, dominated the centre, and formed a strong battery on the “h” file, which left black without counter-play. After gaining the initiative, Kashlinskaya showed excellent technique and converted her advantage into a flawless victory, her first one at the Women’s Grand Prix.

It was a tough round for the Indian players since Humpy Koneru (2560) was also on the brink of being defeated. Alexandra Kosteniuk (2495) came out of the opening with a more dynamic position, an advantage that she later converted into a rook endgame with two pawns up. However, Humpy found some creative ways to defend her position – pulling up a final trick, with a stalemate setup, that allowed her to get away with a draw.

In the duel between western players, Antoaneta Stefanova (2491) and Elisabeth Paethz (2479) played a well-known line in the sharp Najdorf Defence. Even though the White pieces looked very menacing, Black’s King was never really at risk. As soon as Paehtz was given the chance, she launched a counterattack that led to a perpetual check, reaching a draw after 25 moves.

The Russian duel between Goryachkina (2564) and Lagno (2545) ended in a draw. Goryachkina followed a modern idea in the Moscow variation, but Lagno managed to come out of the opening in full control of the position. However, the position was quite symmetrical, with only one open file, and after exchanging rooks the game came down to an opposite-coloured bishops endgame.

Standings after 4 rounds:

1
 Gunina, Valentina
3 2502  
2
 Ju, Wenjun
3 2576 
3
 Goryachkina, Aleksandra
2? 2564 
4
 Koneru, Humpy
2? 2560 
5
 Harika, Dronavalli
2 2503  
6
 Paehtz, Elisabeth
2 2479 
7
 Lagno, Kateryna
2 2545  
8
 Stefanova, Antoaneta
1? 2491   
9
 Cramling, Pia
1? 2487   
10
 Kashlinskaya, Alina
1? 2487   
11
 Kosteniuk, Alexandra
1? 2495   
12
 Sebag, Marie
1 2450   

The fifth-round games will be played on September 15, at 3 pm local time (GMT +3).

Spectators can follow the games with English and Russian commentaries: www.youtube.com/fidechannel

Official website: https://wgp2019.fide.com

A gallery with photos in high resolution is at the disposal of the press on the official FIDE Flickr account.

Text: Keti Tsatsalashvili
Photos: David Llada

m 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-22 Ju Wenjun CHINAm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-112 Alexandra Kosteniuk RUSSIAm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-133 Kateryna Lagno RUSSIAm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-135 Pia Cramling Valentina Gunina SWEDEN RUSSIAm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-246 Ju Wenjun CHINAm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-252 Antoaneta Stefanova BULGARIAm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-280 Marie Sebag FRANCE Ju Wenjunm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-289 Valentina Gunina RUSSIAm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-297 Elisabeth Paehtz GERMANY cropm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-313 Pia Cramling SWEDENm 20190914 Skolkovo Women Grand Prix R04-315 Alina Kashlinskaya Harika Dronavalli RUSSIA INDIA

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

2019 3rd Quarter FIDE Presidential Board Meeting

Saturday, September 14th, 2019
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The new FIDE Charter was the main point in the agenda of the 2019 third quarter Presidential Board meeting, held in Budapest last weekend. The Hungarian Chess Federation took the opportunity to announce during the gala dinner that their country will bid to organize the Chess Olympiad in2014.

The Presidential Board meeting opened with the report from the FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich, who informed the attendants about his recent trips to South America and Morocco. The main outcome from these trips has beena firm commitment from political authorities in the visited countries to support chess and to organize some top events in the near future. The President also briefed the Board about the incoming events (World Cup and Women’s Grand Prix), and about the new FIDE website that is about to be launched.

On behalf of the Global Strategy Commission, Emil Sutovsky reported on the progress regarding FIDE’s flag-ship competitions. The Candidates tournament 2020 is confirmed to take place in Ekaterinburg during the second half of March (exact dates will be confirmed soon). As for the World Championship, there are three cities interested in hosting the match, but since the three of them requested some extra time, the bidding deadline has been postponed to November 1st.

The chapter about the Chess Olympiad sparked an interesting debate regarding the role of captains. Should they be allowed to talk to their players during the games? In many cases, a strong Grandmaster is acting as a captain for a team where the average rating is 2300. Is it fair in a case like this that the captain can instruct a player to accept or offer a draw?Different views were exchanged on this topic, with the general conclusion that the matter deserves a longer discussion in the near future.

Another important point that was unanimously approved was the fees reduction. FIDE will cut or waive fees at youth events by 120,000 euros annually, starting in January 2020. This will mean an approximate 40% cut in that concept. A small panel (for more agility) will be created to finalize the details on how this reduction will come into force.

Viktor Bologan was in charge of reporting about the Planning and Development Commission and he presented the members of the board with very detailed figures about how the Development Fund has been used so far to support and develop federations. Some members of the board took the chance to exchange views on the best ways to promote chess. Bachar Kouatly strongly suggested investing in formation, rather than in events, while Judit Polgar offered her views and experience on how to use online tools for chess promotion. In general, the consensus was that FIDE should shift a little from supporting events, to support activities that imply grassroot promotion and growth.

The most important point of this Presidential Board meeting was probably the reform of the FIDE Statutes. Antonio Rivello was given the task to chair a group of experts charged to prepare a proposal of full reform of the current Statutes, drafting a juridically correct and comprehensive text that the Constitutional Commission proposed to call “FIDE Charter”. “FIDE needs this reform, not only because the current FIDE Statutes were written many decades ago and the role of international sports federations is completely different today, as it is our society. But mainly because we need to move in the direction of a more modern, transparent, democratic and efficient institution, and the main rules of our organisation have a fundamental role to play in making this possible.”, explained Roberto, who received warm applause when he finished his presentation.

The members of the Presidential Board were invited to a gala dinner at the Hungarian Parliament. P?l Schmitt, former Hungarian Olympic fencer, member of the IOC and politician who served as President of Hungary from 2010 to 2012, gave the opening speech before the dinner. Mr Schmitt told the attendants how he uses to play chess online for more than an hour a day and expressed his firm support to the recognition of chess as a sport by the IOC.

Tam?s Menczer, Minister of State of Ministry of Foreign Affairs, emphasized that the Hungarians are famous for being good organizers,with great experience in organizing major international sports events, and the country has a sports-friendly government that supports the efforts of the Hungarian Chess Association.

But the biggest announcement came from L?szl? Szab?, recently elected as the new Presidentof the Hungarian Chess Association (MSSZ). After stressing the close links between chess and the some of the biggest personalities in the history of the country, he announced that Hungary will bid to host the 2024 Chess Olympiad.

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Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

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