Archive for April, 2019

FIDE Chess.com Grand Swiss Tournament – what a name!

Friday, April 19th, 2019

official logo

FIDE is happy to confirm that the contract with the organizers of FIDE Chess.com Grand Swiss Tournament has been signed, and we are looking forward to an exceptional event on Isle of Man.

Please, find below the updated version of the Tournament Regulations in accordance with the decision of the FIDE Presidential Board as well as the current ranking of top 120 players by average rating as per April 1, 2019. The final list of qualifying players and reserves will be published within a week after the publication of the June 2019 FIDE Rating List.

REGULATIONS

QUALIFIERS

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Carlsen – Anand World Championship Match Game 6

Thursday, April 18th, 2019

[Event "WCh 2014"]
[Site "Sochi RUS"]
[Date "2014.11.15"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B41"]
[WhiteElo "2863"]
[BlackElo "2792"]
[PlyCount "75"]
[EventDate "2014.11.04"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. c4 Nf6 6. Nc3 Bb4 7. Qd3 Nc6 8.
Nxc6 dxc6 9. Qxd8+ Kxd8 10. e5 Nd7 (10… Ne4 11. a3 Bxc3+ 12. bxc3 Nxc3 13. a4
Ne4 14. Be3 f6 15. Bd3 Ng5 16. exf6 gxf6 17. f4 Nf7 18. O-O {with more than
enough play for the pawn}) 11. Bf4 Bxc3+ 12. bxc3 Kc7 13. h4 $1 {White uses
his space advantage and bishop pair to pressure the kingside. Now the rook can
join the action} b6 14. h5 h6 ({Allowing h6 is also problematic} 14… Bb7 15.
Rd1 Nc5 16. h6 g6 17. Rh3 Rad8 18. Rd4 Na4 19. Bg5 $1) 15. O-O-O Bb7 16. Rd3 c5
17. Rg3 Rag8 18. Bd3 {Threat Rh1-h4-g4 Black needs to be able to to play g7-g6}
Nf8 19. Be3 g6 20. hxg6 Nxg6 21. Rh5 Bc6 22. Bc2 (22. Kd2 Ne7 23. Rxg8 Rxg8 24.
g3 Rd8 25. Ke2 (25. Kc2 Ba4+ $11 26. Kd2 Nf5 27. Bxh6 b5 $1) 25… Bf3+ $1)
22… Kb7 23. Rg4 a5 24. Bd1 Rd8 25. Bc2 Rdg8 26. Kd2 $4 a4 $4 (26… Nxe5 27.
Rxg8 Nxc4+ 28. Kd3 Nb2+ 29. Ke2 Rxg8) 27. Ke2 a3 28. f3 Rd8 29. Ke1 ({I
suspect White is winning after} 29. Bxg6 fxg6 30. Rxg6 Be8 31. Rg7+ Rd7 32.
Rxd7+ Bxd7 33. Rxh6 Rxh6 34. Bxh6 Ba4 $1 35. Bc1 Bc2 36. Bxa3 Bb1 37. Ke3 Kc7
38. Kf4 Kd7 39. Kg5 (39. Bxc5 $5 bxc5 40. a4 Ba2 41. Kg5 Ke7 42. g4 Bxc4 43. f4
Kf7 44. f5) 39… Ke7 40. g4 Bxa2 41. f4 Bxc4 42. Kg6 Be2 43. f5 Bxg4 44. f6+
Kf8 45. f7 {Wins}) 29… Rd7 30. Bc1 Ra8 31. Ke2 Ba4 $6 (31… Rad8 $5 32. Bxh6
Rh8 $1 33. Bxg6 fxg6 34. Rxg6 Ba4) 32. Be4+ Bc6 $2 ({Black can fight with}
32… Ka7 33. Bxa8 Kxa8 34. Rxh6 Rd1 35. Bxa3 Ra1 36. Rg5 Rxa2+ 37. Ke1 Rxa3
38. Rh7) 33. Bxg6 fxg6 34. Rxg6 Ba4 35. Rxe6 Rd1 36. Bxa3 Ra1 37. Ke3 Bc2 38.
Re7+ (38. Re7+ Kc6 39. Rxh6+) (38. Re7+ Ka6 39. Rxh6 Rxa2 40. Bxc5) (38. Re7+
Kc8 39. Rxh6 Rxa3 40. Rh8#) 1-0

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Source: The Week in Chess

Carlsen – Anand World Championship Match Game 5

Thursday, April 18th, 2019

[Event "WCh 2014"]
[Site "Sochi RUS"]
[Date "2014.11.14"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Black "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E16"]
[WhiteElo "2792"]
[BlackElo "2863"]
[Annotator "IM Malcolm Pein"]
[PlyCount "78"]
[EventDate "2014.11.04"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb4+ 5. Bd2 Be7 6. Nc3 Bb7 7. Bg2 c6 8. e4
d5 9. exd5 cxd5 10. Ne5 O-O 11. O-O Nc6 12. cxd5 Nxe5 13. d6 Nc6 14. dxe7 Qxe7
15. Bg5 h6 16. d5 Na5 17. Bxf6 (17. d6 Qd8 18. Bxf6 Qxf6 19. Qe2 Rad8 20. Rfd1
Bxg2 21. Kxg2) 17… Qxf6 18. dxe6 Qxe6 (18… Bxg2 19. exf7+ Rxf7 20. Kxg2 Nc4
) 19. Re1 Qf6 20. Nd5 Bxd5 (20… Qxb2 21. Re2 Qa3 22. Re3 Qb2 23. Rb1 Qxa2 24.
Ra1 Qc4 25. Rxa5 bxa5 26. Ne7+ Kh8 27. Bxb7 Rad8 28. Qa1 Rd3) 21. Bxd5 Rad8 22.
Qf3 Qxb2 23. Rad1 Qf6 {The endgame looks grim but if Carlsen can win the a
pawn for his queenside he holds easily enough} (23… Rd7 $5 24. Qf5 Rc7 25.
Be4 g6 26. Qf4 Rfc8 27. Qxh6 Qf6 28. h4 Nc4 29. h5 Ne5 30. hxg6 Qxf2+ $1 31.
Kxf2 Ng4+) 24. Qxf6 gxf6 25. Re7 Kg7 26. Rxa7 Nc6 $1 27. Rb7 Nb4 28. Bb3 Rxd1+
29. Bxd1 Nxa2 30. Rxb6 Nc3 31. Bf3 f5 32. Kg2 Rd8 33. Rc6 Ne4 34. Bxe4 fxe4 35.
Rc4 f5 36. g4 Rd2 37. gxf5 e3 38. Re4 Rxf2+ 39. Kg3 Rxf5 1/2-1/2

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The post Carlsen – Anand World Championship Match Game 5 appeared first on Chess.co.uk.

Source: The Week in Chess

Carlsen – Anand World Championship Match Game 4

Thursday, April 18th, 2019

[Event "WCh 2014"]
[Site "Sochi RUS"]
[Date "2014.11.12"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B40"]
[WhiteElo "2863"]
[BlackElo "2792"]
[Annotator "IM Malcolm Pein"]
[PlyCount "94"]
[EventDate "2014.11.04"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. g3 Nc6 4. Bg2 d5 5. exd5 exd5 6. O-O Nf6 7. d4 Be7 8. Be3
(8. Nc3 O-O 9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. a3 {Zviagintsev-Rublevsky 2014}) 8… cxd4 (8…
Ng4 $5) 9. Nxd4 Bg4 (9… O-O 10. Nc3 Bg4 {Jones-Caruana Reykjavik Open 2012})
10. Qd3 Qd7 11. Nd2 O-O 12. N2f3 Rfe8 13. Rfe1 Bd6 $1 {Improving the bishop
and ruling out Nxc6 and Ne5} 14. c3 h6 15. Qf1 {This move elicited a whole
range of assessments from horrible to insprired. It looks best to me, White
needs to play h2-h3 and the queen was vulnerable to attack} Bh5 16. h3 ({If
White hunts the bishop} 16. Nh4 Bc5 17. h3 Nxd4 (17… Bxd4 18. cxd4 Ne4) 18.
cxd4 Bb4 19. Rec1 g5 $1 20. Nf3 Bxf3 21. Bxf3 Ne4 {Black is active}) 16… Bg6
{But now Black is better, his bishop comes to e4} 17. Rad1 Rad8 18. Nxc6 bxc6
19. c4 Be4 20. Bd4 Nh7 $6 (20… Re6) 21. cxd5 Bxd5 $5 {Now Black has long
term problems} ({But if} 21… cxd5 22. Qa6) 22. Rxe8+ Rxe8 23. Qd3 Nf8 24. Nh4
Be5 $1 {Black was vulnerable down the ‘d’ file} 25. Bxd5 Qxd5 26. Bxe5 Qxe5 27.
b3 Ne6 28. Nf3 Qf6 29. Kg2 Rd8 30. Qe2 Rd5 {White still has an edge but Anand
gradually neutralises it} 31. Rxd5 cxd5 32. Ne5 ({I expected} 32. Qe5 Qd8 33.
Nd4 Nxd4 34. Qxd4 {When White can grind}) 32… Qf5 (32… Nd4 33. Qe3 Nc2 34.
Qc3 $11) 33. Nd3 Nd4 34. g4 {A surprise for Anand with little time on the clock
} Qd7 (34… Nxe2 35. gxf5 Kf8 $11 36. Kf3 $5 Ng1+ 37. Ke3 Nxh3 38. Kd4 h5) 35.
Qe5 Ne6 36. Kg3 Qb5 37. Nf4 Nxf4 38. Kxf4 Qb4+ 39. Kf3 d4 {The passed pawn
gives Anand enough counterplay to dra} 40. Qe8+ Kh7 41. Qxf7 Qd2 $1 (41… Qc3+
42. Ke4 d3 43. Qf3 $1 Qc6+ 44. Ke3 Qc3 45. Qe4+ {wins the pawn}) (41… d3 42.
Qf5+) 42. Qf5+ {Carlsen has to force a draw, if} (42. Ke4 d3 $11) 42… Kh8 (
42… Kg8 43. Qd5+ Kh8 44. Qa8+ Kh7 45. Qe4+ Kg8 46. Qe8+ Kh7 47. Qe2 $1 Qc3+
48. Ke4) 43. h4 Qxa2 44. Qe6 Qd2 45. Qe8+ Kh7 46. Qe4+ Kh8 47. Qe8+ Kh7 1/2-1/2

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Source: The Week in Chess

Carlsen – Anand World Championship Match Game 3

Thursday, April 18th, 2019

[Event "WCh 2014"]
[Site "Sochi RUS"]
[Date "2014.11.11"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Anand, V."]
[Black "Carlsen, M."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D37"]
[WhiteElo "2792"]
[BlackElo "2863"]
[Annotator "IM Malcolm Pein"]
[PlyCount "67"]
[EventDate "2014.11.08"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. c5 c6 (7…
Nh5 {Is the other main line}) 8. Bd3 b6 9. b4 a5 10. a3 Ba6 11. Bxa6 Rxa6 12.
b5 $1 cxb5 13. c6 Qc8 14. c7 b4 15. Nb5 a4 16. Rc1 Ne4 17. Ng5 Ndf6 (17… Bxg5
18. Bxg5 Nxg5 $4 (18… Ra5 19. Be7 $5 Re8 (19… Rxb5 20. Bxf8 Kxf8 21. Qxa4
Ra5 22. Qxb4+ {is somewhat unclear. The passed pawn on c7 does compensate for
Black’s two knights against a rook.} Ke8 $1 $13) 20. Bxb4 Rxb5 21. Qxa4 $14 {
and the rook on b5 is trapped. This must favor White as Black’s rook on e8 is
very passive.}) 19. Nd6 $18 {wins}) 18. Nxe4 Nxe4 (18… dxe4 {was better
because} 19. Nd6 Bxd6 20. Bxd6 b3 21. Bxf8 Kxf8 {Is fine for Black. Nd5 is key
resource in this line}) 19. f3 Ra5 20. fxe4 $1 {A novelty but seemingly one
which was known to other leading players but not Carlsen.} (20. Qe2 Qd7 21.
fxe4 Rc8 $1 $15 {Aronian-Adams, 2013. Vishy must have taken a fresh look at
this game.}) 20… Rxb5 21. Qxa4 Ra5 22. Qc6 $1 bxa3 23. exd5 Rxd5 24. Qxb6 {
White’s c7 pawn is much stronger and better supported than Black’s a3 pawn} Qd7
25. O-O (25. Qa6 {Was the computer’s choice}) 25… Rc8 (25… g5 26. Qb8 $1
Rc8 27. Qxc8+ Qxc8 28. Rb1 $16) 26. Rc6 {The exact position was seen in the
game Tomashevsky, Evgeny – Riazantsev, Alexander Russian Super Final 2008 but
with a white pawn on h3 not on h2!  Tomashevsky won easily} g5 27. Bg3 Bb4 28.
Ra1 $1 {Neutralising the a3 pawn – there is no hurry Black has no constructive
moves} ({If Black does nothing White has a winning plan} 28. Ra1 h6 29. h3 h5 (
29… Kg7) 30. Kh1 h4 31. Bh2 Kh7 32. Qb7 Kg8 33. Rb6 Be7 34. Qxc8+ Qxc8 35.
Rb8) 28… Ba5 29. Qa6 $1 Bxc7 30. Qc4 $1 {The pin wins a piece} e5 31. Bxe5
Rxe5 32. dxe5 Qe7 33. e6 $1 Kf8 34. Rc1 {Basically won at home this game but
Anand had to be accurate and certainly was} 1-0

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Source: The Week in Chess

Carlsen – Anand World Championship Match Game 2

Thursday, April 18th, 2019

[Event "WCh 2014"]
[Site "Sochi RUS"]
[Date "2014.11.09"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
[Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C65"]
[WhiteElo "2863"]
[BlackElo "2792"]
[Annotator "IM Malcolm Pein"]
[PlyCount "69"]
[EventDate "2014.11.04"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 Bc5 5. O-O d6 6. Re1 O-O 7. Bxc6 bxc6 8.
h3 Re8 9. Nbd2 Nd7 10. Nc4 Bb6 11. a4 a5 12. Nxb6 {Carlsen: ” Wasn’t
particularly thriled to take but didn’t see too many useful moves he is
preparing d5″} cxb6 13. d4 Qc7 (13… c5 {Svidler make White commit} 14. d5 h6
15. c4) 14. Ra3 $1 Nf8 15. dxe5 dxe5 16. Nh4 $1 {Black must play very
accurately to keep the balance.} Rd8 17. Qh5 f6 18. Nf5 Be6 (18… Ne6 {
Nakamura} 19. Rg3 (19. Bh6 $2 gxh6 20. Rg3+ Kh8 21. Qxh6 Qf7) 19… Kh8 20. Rg4
) (18… Qf7 {Anand and Carlsen}) 19. Rg3 Ng6 20. h4 ({The computer was
excited by} 20. Bh6 gxh6 21. Rxg6+ {Carlsen: “I thought h4 as very good so
didn’t look more other things”} hxg6 22. Qxg6+ Kf8 23. Qxf6+ Qf7 24. Qxh6+ Ke8
25. Qh8+ Qf8 26. Qxe5 Kf7 27. Nd4 Qd6 (27… Rxd4 28. Qxd4) 28. Qh5+ Kg8 29.
Qg5+ Kf7 30. e5 $1 $18) 20… Bxf5 (20… Rd7 21. Bh6 Bxf5 22. exf5 Nf8 23. Re4
) 21. exf5 Nf4 22. Bxf4 exf4 23. Rc3 c5 24. Re6 ({Interesting} 24. Rc4 Qf7 25.
Qxf7+ (25. Qe2 f3 26. gxf3) 25… Kxf7 26. Rxf4 Rd2 27. Re6 Rb8 28. Rc6 Rb7 29.
Rc4 Rd5 30. g4 h5 31. f3 hxg4 32. fxg4 Rd2 33. Re4 Rxc2 34. g5) 24… Rab8 (
24… h6 {Idea Rd4 was the best chance}) 25. Rc4 Qd7 26. Kh2 Rf8 (26… Re8 27.
Rce4) (26… Qd1 27. Re8+ {Are both lost in different ways}) 27. Rce4 Rb7 28.
Qe2 b5 {Carlsen: “I missed this as I thought Re7 was good” Actually it was} 29.
b3 ({It was} 29. Re7 Qd6 30. f3 Rxe7 31. Rxe7 bxa4 32. Qe4 Qb8 33. Qxa4 Kh8 34.
Qxa5 Qxb2 35. Qxc5 Rg8 36. c4) 29… bxa4 30. bxa4 Rb4 31. Re7 Qd6 32. Qf3 (32.
f3) 32… Rxe4 33. Qxe4 f3+ (33… Kh8 34. Re8 h6 35. Qd3) 34. g3 h5 $4 (34…
Qd2 35. Qxf3 Qxc2 36. Kg2 Kh8 37. Qc6 h6 38. Ra7 Qxf5 39. Rxa5 Qc8 40. Qxc5
Qxc5 41. Rxc5 {White will win}) 35. Qb7 $1 {g7 falls} 1-0

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Source: The Week in Chess

Carlsen – Anand World Championship Match Game 1

Thursday, April 18th, 2019

[Event "WCh 2014"]
[Site "Sochi RUS"]
[Date "2014.11.08"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Anand, V."]
[Black "Carlsen, M."]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D85"]
[WhiteElo "2792"]
[BlackElo "2863"]
[Annotator "IM Malcolm Pein"]
[PlyCount "95"]
[EventDate "2014.11.08"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. Bd2 Bg7 6. e4 Nxc3 (6… Nb6 7.
Be3 O-O 8. Be2 Nc6 9. Nf3 Bg4 {Korchnoi-Kasparov Wijk an Zee 2000 Is a typical
way of attacking the d4 which is Black’s focus in the Gruenfeld}) 7. Bxc3 O-O
8. Qd2 {Unlike the Exchange variation 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 White intends to
support d4 with bishop and queen. He can also use the ‘c’ file although Black
has his ambitions there too as we will see} Nc6 {Carlsen played this quickly.
Recent practice has been focused on the sharper} (8… c5 9. d5 e6 10. Bc4 {
Tomashevsky-Kasimdzhanov from the Baku Grand Prix very recently.}) 9. Nf3 {I
was surprised when Carlsen thought for 15 minutes now} Bg4 10. d5 Bxf3 11. Bxg7
{A novelty !} (11. gxf3 Ne5 12. Be2 c6 {Moiseenko-Nepomniachtchi, 0-1 August
2014.}) 11… Kxg7 12. gxf3 Ne5 13. O-O-O ({White gets no advantage after} 13.
Qc3 f6 14. O-O-O c6 15. f4 Nf7 16. dxc6 Qc7 $1 17. cxb7 Qxf4+ 18. Qe3 (18. Kb1
Qxe4+ 19. Bd3 Qxb7 {Is very good for Black}) 18… Qc7+ 19. Kb1 Qxb7 20. Bc4
Rab8 21. Bb3 a5 {Black is fine his king is safe and his attack is underway})
13… c6 $1 {Black must secure counterplay or he will be rolled over with f4
and e5 and then h4 will come} (13… Nxf3 $2 {Loses} 14. Qc3+) 14. Qc3 (14.
dxc6 Qc7) 14… f6 15. Bh3 cxd5 16. exd5 $1 {Anti intuitive and indeed Anand’s
pawn weaknesses come back to haunt him but activity is key} (16. Rxd5 Qb6 $17 {
starts looking bad for White. His control of the d-file is worthless as long
as the knight is stable on e5, since it guards d7. Kicking out t he knight is
not an option.} 17. f4 $2 e6 $1 {And the strong threat is Rac8. Black would
already be winning.}) (16. f4 Nc4 17. Rxd5 Qc7 18. e5 Qc6 19. Rhd1 Nb6 $1)
16… Nf7 17. f4 Qd6 18. Qd4 {White has control but Black is very solid.
Chances seem about even but Anand gets outplayed} Rad8 19. Be6 Qb6 $1 {Anand
now avoids an endgame with weak pawns but that was best.} 20. Qd2 $6 (20. Qxb6
axb6 21. Kb1 $1 {It was counter intuitive to go nto an endgame ith a bad pawn
srtructre but the idea of Rc1-c7 causes some problems} Nd6 22. Rc1 f5 $1 23.
Rc7 Kf6 24. Bd7 $1 Ne4 25. Rxb7 {Black should hold after} Rb8 26. Rc7 Nxf2 27.
Rhc1 Ne4) 20… Rd6 $1 21. Rhe1 (21. Kb1 Nd8 22. Bg4 Nc6 $5) 21… Nd8 $1 22.
f5 Nxe6 23. Rxe6 {White has pressure on e7 but once that is defended his weak
pawns are a problem} Qc7+ 24. Kb1 Rc8 $6 ({This might let it slip} 24… Rfd8
25. Rc1 Qd7 26. Rd1 g5 $5 27. h4 gxh4 $1) 25. Rde1 (25. Re3 Rxd5 26. Rxe7+ Qxe7
27. Qxd5 Rc7 $15) 25… Rxe6 26. Rxe6 Rd8 (26… gxf5 $5) 27. Qe3 Rd7 28. d6 $1
{Eliminating one weakness} exd6 29. Qd4 Rf7 30. fxg6 hxg6 31. Rxd6 a6 32. a3
Qa5 33. f4 (33. h4 Qf5+ 34. Ka2 Re7) 33… Qh5 34. Qd2 Qc5 35. Rd5 Qc4 36. Rd7
Qc6 37. Rd6 (37. Rxf7+ Kxf7 38. Qe3 a5 $1 {Black can advance his king with
some chances}) 37… Qe4+ 38. Ka2 Re7 39. Qc1 a5 40. Qf1 a4 {At this point the
doom mongerers were referring to the quiet positions Anand lost in the
previous match} 41. Rd1 Qc2 42. Rd4 Re2 $6 (42… Re3 $1 {Carlsen misses a
chance! The threat is Rxa3+ Kxa3 Qb3#} 43. Qd1 (43. Rd7+ Kf8 44. Rxb7 Rb3 45.
Rxb3 axb3+ 46. Ka1 Qxh2 47. Qd1 $1 {Threatening perpetual} Qh3 $1 {– Computer
would be very unpleasant}) 43… Qxd1 44. Rxd1 Rb3 $1 {Is no fun at all,
Black’s king advances}) 43. Rb4 $1 b5 44. Qh1 $1 {Saving the game} Re7 (44…
Rxh2 45. Qb7+ Kh6 46. Qb8 $1) 45. Qd5 Re1 46. Qd7+ Kh6 47. Qh3+ Kg7 48. Qd7+
1/2-1/2

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Source: The Week in Chess

Chess Streamers To Play Komodo Boss Rush In Twitch Rivals Event

Thursday, April 18th, 2019

Chess.com and Twitch are teaming up to bring chess to the esports mainstream with a new man-vs-machine event called Komodo Boss Rush on Wednesday, April 24 at 9 a.m. PDT on www.Twitch.tv/TwitchRivals and&nbs…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

New Carlsen-Caruana Clash At Grenke Chess Classic

Thursday, April 18th, 2019

With five players from the world's top 10, the Grenke Chess Classic starts on Saturday in Karlsruhe, Germany. World champion Magnus Carlsen and last year's Grenke winner Fabiano Caruana will play their first classical game since their November tit…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Turkey welcomes participants of World Schools Championships 2019

Thursday, April 18th, 2019

wscc2019

World School Individual Championships 2019 started in Lara, Antalya, Turkey on the 17th of April. 396 participants will compete in 12 age groups (Open and Girls under 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 and 17). Champions will be determined on the 26th of April. The games will take place in the conference hall of the 5-star hotels, Aska Lara Resort & Spa Hotel and Adalya Elite Lara Hotel in Lara/Antalya.

World School Chess Championship 2019 Organizing Committee published “Info Bulletin” which includes useful information for participants.

The tournament is organized under the auspices of the International Chess Federation (FIDE) and the Turkish Chess Federation

FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich sent a welcoming letter for the participants.

Official website 

 

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

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