Archive for April, 2018

Cancellation of Ratings for Bulgarian Players delated until 31st May, 2018

Monday, April 30th, 2018

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On 28th April, 2018 FIDE has received a letter from the Bulgarian Federation of Chess 1928 providing some of the information requested. FIDE Deputy President, Mr. Georgios Makropoulos has therefore agreed to delay the cancellation of ratings of Bulgarian FIDE players from 30th April, 2018 until 31st May, 2018 to enable the Bulgarians to provide the missing information.

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Monday, April 30th, 2018
Aron Kaptsan Memorial  Sectional Tournament May 26-27
CFC Standard Rated
 Prize funds enhanced by $ 250 !
This is a very popular format with players of all ratings.
.Registered players will have the chance to play in a round -robin with players in their own rating group. The lowest section may be a swiss style tournament. 

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Players must commit to play all 5 rounds - 

Deadline for registration is 10 am on May 26, 2018

Just a reminder that the tournament will be run in sections with 6 players.

Players are assigned to the sections according to the last available rating list.

Location: University of Winnipeg, Room (to be announced)

Blair Rutter will be Tournament Director

The tournament director will sort the registrants by rating  in 6 player Round Robin sections. Lowest sections that cannot be divided into 6 players will become a swiss.

Time Control:  Game / 50 + 10 second increment

Entry Fee: $ 20 
Approximate Round times – (Rounds will commence immediately at the end of the previous round)
Round 1: Saturday 10:00 am
Round 2: Saturday approx.  12:30 pm
Round 3: Saturday approx  2:30 pm
Round 4: Sunday 10:00 a.m.
Round 5: Sunday approx 12:30 pm or earlier by mutual agreement.
 

All players in the tournament must also be Chess Federation of Canada members.
CFC Membership information:
(membership can be purchased at the tournament site)
Former/returning members:
$ 20 for a one-tournament membership or $ 49 for 12 months, Juniors – one
tournament membership $ 10, $34 for 12 months.
New members pay only $ 16 for a one-tournament membership or $ 36 for 12
months, Juniors – one tournament membership $ 10, $24 for 12 months.

Source: Chess Manitoba

Shankland Wins U.S. Championship; Women Go To Playoff

Monday, April 30th, 2018

Horse racing went 37 years without a Triple Crown winner. It only took GM Sam Shankland 26 years.
Shankland won again today, his sixth victory in St. Louis, to win the 2018 U.S. Championship, a 2700 rating, and a spot on the American t…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

2018 U.S. Championships Round 10 Recap

Sunday, April 29th, 2018

ShanklandThe championship rounds are always the most promising. The tension, the suspense revolving around the result, all of these and more are what makes us love chess. With only one round to go, the stakes are at their peak, and the players will battle tooth and nail for the top spot in both divisions. But first let’s look at how we got here and get right into the recap!

U.S. Championship

Onischuk vs Shankland

The two most important actors in this year’s championship play are undoubtedly Shankland and Caruana. These two have been racing against each other for the whole tournament, and the dazzling pace at which they are competing has kept others at bay.
Onischuk started the game in a promising way, but the middle game was once again only Shankland. Starting with his fierce 12…g5! Shankland took control of the game, revolving around the powerful knight on e4 and the overall control of the light squares. Onischuk was unable to tame Black’s initiative and lost a difficult R+N vs R+B endgame. Shankland’s piece activity coupled with the structural weaknesses that plagued white throughout the game allowed the leader to capitalize and take yet another step toward the title.
Zherebukh vs Caruana

And what better runner up to keep you on your toes than the world championship challenger, Fabiano Caruana. The young titan has been having the year of his life, with three tournament wins out of his last four, and a secured bid for the world chess crown. It appears he is not stopping anytime soon. The black pieces have been deadly in the hands of Caruana, who once again proved it with a smooth victory against Zherebukh, the player that made history last year when he defeated Caruana in a positional masterpiece.
That was not the case in this year’s edition, as Caruana swiftly outplayed Zherebukh in a closed Sicilian. Just like in the game of Shankland, another explosive …g5! move made its way, and after its inclusion on the board it was all over for White. The control of the important e5 square, and the drowning pressure forced Zherebukh to resign at move 31. Caruana is half a point behind Shankland going into the decisive final round.
Robson vs So

After his blistering hot start, Wesley has been unable to maintain the pace and has made eight consecutive draws. Today’s game was no different than most of the other draws: he equalized, got a slightly better endgame, but was unable and unwilling to try for an advantage. With this draw, So is out of the race for the championship, as he is one point and a half behind the leader Shankland.

Three players score first victories

This was also the round of first victories for three of the players. Nakamura drew first blood after completely dismantling Akobian’s position in a tactical masterpiece.
The two youngsters, Liang and Xiong, also had their best days at this year’s championship as they outfoxed their respective opponents in hotly contested battles. While Xiong’s victory was smooth and precise, Liang’s path to victory was slightly more treacherous, as he had to defend a worse position against Izoria before swindling him and taking the full point home.
U.S. Women’s Championship

Wang vs Zatonskih

The big clash of the round was obviously the one between the leader Wang and one of the players from the chasing pack, Zatonskih. Wang took an inspired decision when she chose to check her opponent’s theoretical knowledge in a well-known line of the Queen’s Gambit Declined.
It felt very strange to see Zatonskih entering the main line without knowing the nuances, as she burned through almost all her time before Wang was even out of her preparation. With more than an hour advantage on her clock plus a favorable position, it looked as if the young prodigy would close the show right then and there and claim the title. But it was not meant to be, as she played a few conservative moves that didn’t help her attack, allowing Zatonskih to get back and equalize the game. Wang could not be terribly upset with the result, as she remains the favorite to win it all in the last round!

Abrahamyan vs Paikidze

Paikidze was the only player within striking distance of the leader. Being one point behind, she knew her only chance at bridging the gap was to go all out against the always forefront Abrahamyan. Paikidze’s new opening gamble was a flop as she fell under serious strategical pressure.
The pressure soon turned into a decisive material advantage for Abrahamyan. And then Caissa decided to give Paikidze the wink, as Abrahamyan horrendously misplayed the last moves of the game allowing Paikidze to force resignation right before the time control. With this victory, Paikidze narrows the gap between her and Wang to half a point, relaunching the tournament and delaying the crowning of a new champion until the last moment.
Goletiani vs Krush

Krush has been having a tournament filled with ups and downs.
The other games in the ladies’ section were drawn without much controversy, as the whole tournament seems to be currently focusing on the draconian battle between Wang and the tenacious Paikidze, who simply wouldn’t give up until the last moment.

It all comes down to the last round, where the new U.S. Chess Championships victors will be crowned!

Chessdom

U.S. Championships Go ‘Back To The Future’ In Round 10

Sunday, April 29th, 2018

Looks like the leaders at the 2018 U.S. Championships found some plutonium. They’re back from where they just came.
Parts of the music played during the breaks of the live show very closely resemble the “Back to the Future” theme song.&nbsp…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Chess : Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana in the hunt for more prizes

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

Seven months before the world chess title series Norway’s Magnus Carlsen and his US challenger, Fabiano Caruana, are in good form. The American is still benefiting from the momentum he achieved at the Berlin Candidates and in the Grenke Classic while Carlsen has been sparked by the emergence of a dangerous rival. On Thursday night Caruana was sharing the lead in the US chess championship at St Louis on 5.5/8 with three rounds left while Carlsen, after a slow start in the Azeri elite event at Shamkir, had taken a clear 5.5/8 lead. Just one round remains there, but in Saturday’s ninth and final game Carlsen meets China’s Ding Liren, who is only half a point behind the world chess champion. Caruana has been impressive in his four game victories, notably crushing two French Defences 1 e4 e6, but his performance was blemished by …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

Stockholm Chess Challenge 2018

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

nfiStockholm Chess Challenge will be held from 30 April to 5 May.
The tournament is open for players born 1993 or later and with a minimum rating of 2200 ELO. The venue is Stockholm’s Chess Salons in Sodermalm in the centre of Stockholm. The Address is Ringv?gen 9.
Time control is 40 moves in 90 minutes, and additional 15 minutes for the rest of the game from move 41. Inc 30 sec from move 1.

The Swedish Chess Academy together with the main sponsor Nordea invites to a Chess Festival at the Central Station in Stockholm on May 2 in connection with Stockholm Chess Challenge. The event is called “Business enterprise for integration”. The main sponsor for Stockholm Chess Challenge, Data Respons, is also a co-sponsor of the chess event at Central Station.

Nikita Maiorov, Erik Blomqvist, Toms Kantans, Ori Kobo and Burak Firat.
This is the quintet of Grandmasters in Stockholm Chess Challenge 30 April-5 May.

The tournament is meant to be a strong norm tournament for young players. So this is a good opportunity to hunt for an IM or GM norm. Every player born 1993 or later and with rating over 2200 per 1st of April are welcome to join.

Live games with analysis will be provided daily on Chessdom.com with the best chess software competing in the Top Chess Engine Championship – Komodo, Houdini, and Stockfish.

starting list Stockholm Chess Challenge

1 Maiorov Nikita 2543
2 Kantans Toms 2510
3 Blomqvist Erik 2494
4 Kobo Ori 2484
5 Reshef Omer 2482
6 Firat Burak 2446
7 Mereddy Chakravarthi Reddy 2442
8 Haria Ravi 2441
9 Bharathakoti Harsha 2424
10 NESTEROV ARSENIY 2395
11 Gupta Sankalp 2374
12 Nandigani Krishna Teja 2368
13 Rao SV Srinath 2363
14 Kaasen Tor Fredrik 2354
15 Seo Jung Min 2349
16 Cederstam Barsk Carl 2333
17 Atrivella Maria 2326
18 Storme Isak 2323
19 Th?rn Eric 2312
20 Pantzar Milton 2295
21 Anand Saurabh 2294
22 dixit nikhil 2285
23 Kantane Anna 2266
24 Kucuksari Kaan 2251
25 S?rensen Hampus 2243
26 Dijkhuis Oele 2231
27 Betserai Tavonga 2201
28 Betserai Tavonga 2201
29 Anand Pranav 2200
30 Cramling Anna 2200
31 Crevatin Leo 2200
32 sanghani meet 2200
33 Gaurav Kumar 2137

Chessdom

2018 U.S. Championships Round 9 Recap

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

Shankland Another exciting round in Saint Louis, as the favorites to win the event have once again showed their good form and continued their respective streaks. The most important change after today is at the top of the open championship table, where Shankland is now the sole-leader. Let’s get right into the recap and see what happened in today’s critical round!

U.S. Championship

Caruana vs Nakamura
Caruana vs Nakamura
A dramatic game ensued between these two titans of the chess world. Nakamura came extremely well prepared, and his theoretical knowledge allowed him to gain a serious advantage on the clock, as well as a more pleasant position on the board.
Caruana was on the back foot the entire game and could have been severely punished if Nakamura would have played the piece sacrifice he intended to. Instead, Nakamura hesitated to deliver the blow and Caruana was able to harmonize his defensive forces. The game ended in a draw when Caruana found a nice repetition.

Akobian vs So

This was not the most exciting game of the round. Akobian was obviously not in the mood to take any unnecessary risks after losing three games in a row. His cautious play determined the outcome of the game, with Wesley not looking to destabilize the position in dramatic fashion. The players agreed to a draw at move 35.

Lenderman vs Robson

This was a much more interesting draw. Lenderman showed impeccable opening preparation and was looking like he might be able to pull yet another victory, which would have been his third in a row. Robson defended tenaciously, but even so, Lenderman should have capitalized on his magnificent advantage with the move 21.Qa4! which would have secured the victory.
After missing the easy tactic, Robson was able to regroup his pieces, finish his development, and fully equalize the game. It ended in a draw at move 71.

Shankland vs Zherebukh

The most important game of the round was the tenacious fight between the leader, Sam Shankland, and the young Zherebukh.
Shankland managed to win and took the lead.

U.S. Women’s Championship

Paikidze vs Wang

Paikidze vs Wang
The game that held the most weight this round was the clash between the leader, Wang, and the runner up, Paikidze.
Despite playing a rather sharp opening, Paikidze’s opposite castling did not intimidate Wang, who immediately activated her pieces and started creating problems for the former champ. The tension could be felt, as none of the players were willing to take unnecessary risks. Wang had everything to lose, while Paikidze feels like she could catch up with the youngster in the remaining games. A draw was agreed via repetition at move 30.

Krush vs Abrahamyan

A very good performance by the 7-time U.S. Champion, Irina Krush. The experienced Grandmaster stirred the game into the direction she wanted, an easy to press position with a stable, long-term advantage.
Krush dented into her opponent’s structure, created the isolated pawn, and used her great technique to secure an important victory.

Gorti vs Feng

This combative game between the two youngsters was the last game to finish. The players entered an equal endgame, but Feng immediately erred with the overly ambitious 30…e4? This allowed white to corral the advanced pawn and secure the victory with ease after obtaining the material advantage. Feng played all the way until checkmate but could have resigned much earlier.

Sharevich vs Goletiani

Goletiani seems to have found a new wave of enthusiasm and motivation after being interviewed by Maurice. While Sharevich might not have played her most precise game, it is important to give praise to Goletiani’s spotless game. Black checked all the important points: she equalized, created a weakness in her opponent’s camp, and capitalized on it with great precision. Sharevich was forced to concede when her opponent’s forces invaded her camp.

Chessdom

Carlsen Wins Shamkir Chess After Quick Draw With Ding

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

Magnus Carlsen only needed 20 minutes to draw with Ding Liren and clinch his third Gashimov Memorial in Shamkir. When 4…Nd4 5.Nxd4 appeared, in a Rubinstein Four Knights, it was clear that there wouldn’t be a real game today.

Ca…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Shankland, Wang Are Surprise Leaders At U.S. Championships

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

Veal shank is a delicacy in many fine restaurants, and Shankland is still the chef’s special at the 2018 U.S. Championships. GM Sam Shankland (6.5/9), playing in his 10th national championship, won again today in the lone decisive game t…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

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