Archive for August, 2017

Short comes unstuck

Wednesday, August 30th, 2017

NIGEL Short was absent from the British Championships, sponsored by Capital Developments Waterloo Ltd. He was otherwise engaged carving up the field at the strong Xtracon Open in Denmark. Short led with 6.5/7 until he came up against an inspired Baadur Jobava in the eighth round. Jobava won the event and Short finished equal second. Short then travelled to Abu Dhabi where he ended outright second behind Egyptian GM Bassem Amin.

B. Jobava – N. Short |  English Opening to Catalan

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The Daily Telegraph –  www.telegraph.co.uk 

Chess Column: 30th August 2017

by Malcolm Pein

See more chess on www.telegraph.co.uk/chess/

The post Short comes unstuck appeared first on Chess.co.uk.

Source: The Week in Chess

Chinese head-to-head

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

THE Chinese Chess Federation hosted two head-to-head matches to give their leading GMs experience against elite players. As reported last week, Alexander Grischuk defeated Yu Yangyi in late July. Three weeks ago, Chinese number one Ding Liren faced Anish Giri and lost 1.5-2.5 after Giri won the second game, in some style.

With 10…Be6 Giri accepts pawn weaknesses in return for activity. These kinds of positions can be hard for Black to play as if his initiative subsides, his doubled e-pawns are a long-term weakness. With 13…a5 Giri prevents b2-b4 and, as Ding Liren struggles to find a good plan, he directs all his forces to the kingside and breaks through with a sacrifice.

Ding Liren – A. Giri

Giuoco Piano

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.0–0 Nf6 5.d3 0–0 6.h3 d6 7.c3 a6 8.a4 Ba7 9.Re1 h6 10.Nbd2 Be6 11.Bxe6 fxe6 12.Nf1 (12.b4 deserved consideration) 12…Nh5 13.Be3 a5 14.Bxa7 (14.Qb3 Qd7 15.Qxb7?? Rfb8) 14…Rxa7 15.d4 Qf6 (15…exd4 16.Nxd4 Nf4 was also fine) 19.dxe5 Nxe5 20.Nxe5 dxe5 21.f3 Rad8 22.Qc2 Nh5 23.Kh2 Rf6 (In theory, White may be slightly better, but in practice he has to play perfectly to safeguard his king) 24.Rd1 Rdf8 25.Rdd3 Qf7 26.Qd1 Rg6 27.Qe1 Qe7! 28.Kh3 (It’s hard to find a defence here. If 28.Qf2 Rxg3

29.Nxg3 Qxh4+ 30.Kg2 Nf4+ 31.Kf1 Qh3+ 32.Ke1 runs away but 28.Qf2 Rxg3 29.Nxg3 Qxh4+ 30.Kg2 Qg5! puts White in a horrible pin and Black calmly continues Rf6–g6 to win the knight and carry on the attack. Giri wins in slow motion in most lines. The f3-pawn cuts lines of defence for White.

DIAGRAM

28…Rxg3+!! 29.Nxg3 Nf4+ 30.Kh2 Qxh4+ 31.Kg1 Rf6 32.Rd8+ Kh7 33.Rd2 Rg6 34.Rg2 h5 (34…Nxg2 35.Kxg2 h5 was even stronger. There is no escape, Black continues Qh4–f4 and h5–h4) 35.Rh2 Rxg3+ 36.Kh1 Qg5 37.Qf1 h4 38.Re1 h3 39.Rd1 Qh5 40.Rd7 Qxf3+ (Or 40…Rxf3 41.Qg1 Ng2 ) 41.Qxf3 Rxf3 42.Rhd2 Kh6 43.Rd8 Kh5 44.Rh8+ Kg4 45.Rd1 Ne2 0-1 For today’s puzzle, why did White resign? Find two Black mating ideas:

DIAGRAM

ANSWER

GAME

The post Chinese head-to-head appeared first on Chess.co.uk.

Source: The Week in Chess

Speed Chess Championship: The Frenchman vs The X-Man

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

This Wednesday’s second-to-last Speed Chess Championship opening-round clash will feature the world’s new number-two and the youngest player of the event.
GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave, fresh off his career’s marquee victory at the 2017 Sinquef…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Play Chess, Win Wine, And 9 Other Stories You Missed

Monday, August 28th, 2017

Summer is not the time for pros to take a vacation. With tournaments in Paris, Leuven, Biel, St. Louis, Dortmund, Danzhou, Geneva, Khanty-Mansiysk, and many others, the news section has been crowded with tales of 2700s and 2800s plying their trade…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Garry Kasparov’s competitive return upstages Levon Aronian’s victory

Saturday, August 26th, 2017

Winning a top chess tournament by a three-point margin normally captures the headlines but Levon Aronian’s impressive result at the St Louis speed event last week was sweepingly upstaged by Garry Kasparov’s return to competitive play after a 12-year absence. This one-off comeback by the 54-year-old, whom many regard as the all-time No1 ahead of Bobby Fischer and Magnus Carlsen, sparked a tidal wave of interest, with six-figure internet audiences reportedly watching the live video. It was gripping stuff, too, as Kasparov showed his old skills with deep strategic plans yet for most of the event simply could not or would not handle his clock time sensibly. He took 22 minutes to his opponent’s four in a 25-minute rapid game, and spent two of his five minutes for blitz on a single move. He was often down to a few seconds at the end of his games. For a while the chess legend was …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

Caruana Beats Hou Yifan In Strong Speed Champs Showing

Friday, August 25th, 2017

In a later episode of “Seinfeld,” wacky neighbor Cosmo Kramer is lost in downtown Manhattan at the intersection of “first” and “first.”
The “nexus of the universe” nearly repeated itself Thursday at Chess.com’s Speed Chess Championship, as …

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Caruana Nearly Does Caruana, Beats Hou Yifan

Friday, August 25th, 2017

In a later episode of “Seinfeld,” wacky neighbor Cosmo Kramer is lost in downtown Manhattan at the intersection of “first” and “first.”
The “nexus of the universe” nearly repeated itself Thursday at Chess.com’s Speed Chess Championship, as …

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Chess Behind Bars

Friday, August 25th, 2017

Chess Behind Bars by Carl Portman (Hardback)

BUY IT
Hardback, 312 pages

At a time when prisons are in the news due to increasing violence, drug taking and low morale, it has never been more important to focus on education and rehabilitation.

Chess makes a difference because it is a fantastic metaphor for life. We must think before making our move, and accept that our decisions have consequences. It also teaches us to learn from our mistakes and to develop a more disciplined approach to problem solving. Perhaps most importantly of all, it is a constructive use of time and helps to forge friendships.

Chess Behind Bars offers a guide to chess in prisons that will instruct and entertain regardless of your situation. It covers almost every aspect of chess imaginable – from the rules to chess history, from puzzles to famous games, and even some tips for improvement. It is a smorgasbord of chess, seen from an unusual angle.

Chess can and does change lives, and Carl Portman believes that everyone should have the opportunity to learn the game. After all, the prison community knows that there is a dream behind every door.

Carl Portman is the English Chess Federation’s Manager of Chess in Prisons. In 2015 he was awarded the ECF President’s award for services to chess.

BUY IT

Click here to download a sample of this book

ISBN: 978-1-78483-032-8, Quality Chess

The post Chess Behind Bars appeared first on Chess.co.uk.

Source: The Week in Chess

88th FIDE Congress: Executive Board Agenda and Annexes

Friday, August 25th, 2017

official logo

FIDE publishes the Agenda and Annexes for the Executive Board meeting which will be held on 13-14 October 2017 in Goynuk, Antalya, Turkey.

Download the AGENDA.

Download all Annexes in one file.

List of Annexes

1. Decision of the Extraordinary Presidential Board, Athens, April 2017.
2. Financial Regulations for the Board to approve.
3. Audited accounts.
4. Commented accounts.
5. Fees paid to PB members in 2016.
6. Verification Commission’s report.
7. Application of Antigua and Barbuda Chess Federation and its Constitution.
8. Request of ASEAN Chess Confederation to end suspension of their affiliate membership.
9. Qualification Commission’s report (to follow).
10. Summaries of the over-the-board titles.
11. Recommendations on title applications (to follow).
12. Arbiters’ Commission’s Agenda for the meeting in Antalya.
13. Minutes of the Councillors’ meeting in Reykjavik, April 2017.
14. Summaries of the Arbiters’ titles and recommendations on title applications.
15. Trainers’ Commission’s report.
16. Trainers’ titles.
17. Technical Commission’s Agenda for the meeting in Antalya.
18. Rules Commission’s meeting Agenda and appendices for the meeting in Antalya.
19. Amended proposed changes to laws of chess.
20. Constitutional Commission’s report (to follow).
21. Systems of Pairings and Programs Commission’s Agenda for the meeting in Antalya.
22. Appendix to the Agenda of Systems of Pairings and Programs Commission.
23. Development Commission’s report (to follow).
24. Chess in Schools Commission’s Agenda for the meeting in Antalya.
25. Women’s Chess Commission’s report.
26. Social Action Commission’s report (to follow).
27. Social Projects Commission’s report (to follow).
28. Chess for Disabled Commission’s report.
29. Medical Commission’s Agenda for the meeting in Antalya.
30. Ethics Commission’s report.
31. Events Commission’s Agenda for the meeting in Antalya.
32. Summaries of IO titles.
33. Evaluation bids table.
34. Journalist’s Commission’s Agenda for the meeting in Antalya.
35. Anti-Cheating Commission’s report.
36. Online Commission’s Agenda for the meeting in Antalya.
37. Proposed Transfer Regulations.
38. Marketing Committee’s report (to follow).
39. World Team Championships 2017, Chief Arbiter’s report.
40. Bid from Indian Chess Federation for World Junior & Girls U-20 Championship 2019.
41. World Junior & Girls U-20 Championship for disabled 2017, Chief Arbiter’s report.
42. Bid from Chinese Chess Association for World Youth Championships U 14-18 2019.
43. Bid from Indian Chess Federation for World Youth Championships U14-18 2019.
44. Bid from Chinese Chess Association for World Cadet Championship U8-12 2019.
45. Bid from Indian Chess Federation for World Cadet Championship U8-12 2019.
46. Bid from Thailand Chess Association for World Cadet Championship U8-12 2019.
47. Bid from Italian Chess Federation for World Senior Championship 2019.
48. Bid from Romanian Chess Federation for World Senior Championship 2019.
49. Bid from German Chess Federation for World Senior Championship 2019.
50. Bid from Russian Chess Federation for World Senior Championship 2019.
51. Bids evaluation for World Senior Championship 2019.
52. Bid from Greek Chess Federation for World Team Championship 50+, 65+ 2019.
53. Bid from German Chess Federation for World Team Championship 50+, 65+ 2019.
54. Bid from Czech Republic Chess Federation for World Team Championship 50+, 65+ 2019.
55. Bids evaluation for World Team Championship 50+, 65+ 2019.
56. Bid from Indian Chess Federation for World Amateur Championship 2019.
57. Bid from Greek Chess Federation for World Amateur Championship 2019.
58. Bid from Turkish Chess Federation for World Amateur Championship 2019.
59. Bid from Mexican Chess Federation for World Amateur Championship 2019.
60. Bid from Romanian Chess Federation for World Amateur Championship 2019.
61. Bids evaluation for World Amateur Championship 2019.
62. Report of Continental President for Europe.
63. Report of Continental President for Americas.
64. Report of Continental President for Asia (to follow).
65. Report of Continental President for Africa (to follow).

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Obituary – President of Haiti Chess Federation Mr. Jean Lamothe

Friday, August 25th, 2017

Jean Lamothe

FIDE regrets to announce the death of Mr. Jean Lamothe the President of the Haiti Chess Federation. He played for Haiti in three Olympiads and was several times national champion.

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

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