Archive for May, 2017

FIDE Arbiters’ Seminar in Asmara, Eritrea

Monday, May 29th, 2017

From 19 to 23 May 2017 a FIDE Arbiters’ Seminar was organized in Asmara, Eritrea, by the Eritrea Chess Federation, in cooperation with the African Chess Confederation and under the auspices of FIDE.

The lecturer was IA Hassan Khaled (EGY), FIDE Lecturer.

The lectures were in English language.

Twenty eight (28) people from Eritrea and India participated in the Seminar.

FIDE Arbiters’ Seminar in Asmara, Eritrea

Twenty one (21) of them participated in the examination test, held after the end of the lectures and the following succeeded in the test and will be awarded the title of the FIDE Arbiter title after the approval of the next FIDE Congress:

Name FED FIDE I.D.
Yemane Kidane, Bereket ERI -
Zerabruk Sahlu, Debesai ERI 15701174
Weldgebriel Beraki, Kibrom ERI 15701190
Woldemichael Ghebrehywet, Yamane ERI 22300430
Merhawi Gebrehiwet, Samuel ERI 15701204
Berket Lielay, Tesfalem ERI 15701387

FIDE Arbiters’ Seminar in Asmara, Eritrea 1

IA Takis Nikolopoulos
Chairman
FIDE Arbiters’ Commission

Chessdom

Capablanca Memorial 2017 LIVE!

Friday, May 26th, 2017

The Cuban Federation and the National Chess Commission, under the auspices of the National Institute of Sports Physical Education and Recreation (INDER), and the support of Hotel Chain Barcel? and hotel Solymar Arenas Blancas, are organizing the 52nd Capablanca Memorial International Tournament, which will be held from May 26 to June 6, 2017.

This prestigious event is reaching its 52nd edition in 2017, being skipped only in 1966 on the occasion of the World Chess Olympiad in Cuba, in 1970, and in 1978 when Cuba hosted the World Festival of Youth and Students.

The winner of the first tournament in 1962 was Miguel Najdorf. The record with most tournament wins is held by Vassily Ivanchuk with 6 titles (2005, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011, and 2012). Among Cubans, Leinier Dominguez has won three editions (2004, 2008 and 2009).

The main Elite Group is traditionally six-players double round robin. The average elo is 2656. See the full participants list here

Games start May 27th at 21:00 CET. You can follow Capablanca Chess 2017 live at Chessdom or on your mobile via the Chess Arena phone application.

Chessdom

Ding Liren advances China’s move on men’s chess through Fide Grand Prix

Friday, May 26th, 2017

The Chinese are coming. Western chess is highly valued in Beijing, where sports officials long ago set up a national plan to establish their chess players at the pinnacle of the game. Already China has for decades dominated women’s events, where Hou Yifan is the all-time No2 while Tan Zhongyi is the latest in a long line of Chinese world chess champions. Men’s chess has proved much tougher to crack. It is only a decade since China first briefly got a player into the top 10 in the chess rankings, and just three years since the Chinese team won the 150-nation team Olympiad. This week a fresh landmark moved closer when Ding Liren, 24, won the Moscow leg of the four-tournament Fide Grand Prix to give China’s No1 a serious chance of qualifying for the 2018 candidates, the event which will decide the next challenger for …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

FIDE Arbiters’ Seminar in Budapest, Hungary

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Official FIDE logoA FIDE Arbiters’ Seminar is going to be organized from 29 September to 1 October 2017 in Budapest, Hungary, by the Hungarian Chess Federation and under the auspices of FIDE.

The Lecturer will be IA Werner Stubenvoll (AUT), FIDE Qualification Commission Chairman and FIDE Lecturer, and Assistant Lecturer will be IA Miklos Orso (HUN).

The venue of the Seminar will be the Hungarian Chess Federation’s office, Falk Miksa u. Nr. 10, 1055 Budapest (2nd floor).

The language of the Seminar will be English (with translation into Hungarian).

The Seminar will give norms for the FIDE Arbiter title according to the FIDE Regulations for the titles of Arbiters.

For more detailed information:
IA Miklos Orso, e-mail : ratings@chess.hu
Tel.: + 36704891229

IA Takis Nikolopoulos
Chairman
FIDE Arbiters’ Commission

Chessdom

On Chess : Observations from the 2017 Super Nationals VI Chess Tournament

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

The biggest chess event of all time was held May 12-15 in Nashville. In total, 5,577 players vied for prizes in the three national events which are held together at the same site at the same time every four years. The event is a mix of four chess tournaments, the Nationals, the Elementary Chess Championships, the Middle School Chess Championships and the High School Chess Championships. These four competitions are normally held on different weekends and in different cities in the spring. However, every four years, they are held simultaneously at the same site. The Super Nationals require a complex with hundreds of hotel rooms and scores of convention rooms, which is why this tournament has been held at the Gaylord Opryland Resort for several years. The resort’s many rooms can hold the outstanding crowd including …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

Capablanca Memorial 2017

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Capablanca MemorialThe Cuban Federation and the National Chess Commission, under the auspices of the National Institute of Sports Physical Education and Recreation (INDER), and the support of Hotel Chain Barcel? and hotel Solymar Arenas Blancas, are organizing the 52nd Capablanca Memorial International Tournament, which will be held from May 26 to June 6, 2017.

Since 1962, on the initiative of Commander Ernesto “Che” Guevara, an annual tribute to the legendary world champion Jos? Ra?l Capablanca is being held in Havana, Cuba.

This prestigious event is reaching its 52nd edition in 2017, being skipped only in 1966 on the occasion of the World Chess Olympiad in Cuba, in 1970, and in 1978 when Cuba hosted the World Festival of Youth and Students.

The winner of the first tournament in 1962 was Miguel Najdorf. The record with most tournament wins is held by Vassily Ivanchuk with 6 titles (2005, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011, and 2012). Among Cubans, Leinier Dominguez has won three editions (2004, 2008 and 2009).

The main Elite Group is traditionally six-players double round robin. The average elo is 2656. The Open section will feature more than 140 participants, including 14 Grandmasters and 30 International Masters.

Elite section:

GM Ivanchuk Vassily UKR 2738
GM Cordova Emilio PER 2645
GM Sasikiran Krishnan IND 2669
GM Shankland Samuel USA 2676
GM Piorun Kacper POL 2638
GM Ortiz Suarez Isan Reynaldo CUB 2570

Official website

Chessdom

Who is the best bowler among chess players?

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

What are Grand Prix participants mostly know for?

Official YouTube channel of WorldChess, the broadcasting platform for the World Chess Championship cycle events. The interviews with players and organizers of the FIDE Grand Prix in Moscow can be found here.

 

 

Chessdom

Change for 2017 World Junior Championship dates

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

official logo

The 2017 World Junior Championship has changed its dates to 12 – 26 November 2017.

The dates have been changed because of the clash with the European Club Cup.

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

What is the craziest thing Grand Prix participants ever read about themselves?

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

Grandmasters take you to the alternative reality created by journalists.

Official YouTube channel of WorldChess, the broadcasting platform for the World Chess Championship cycle events. The interviews with players and organizers of the FIDE Grand Prix in Moscow can be found here.

 

 

Chessdom

Gawain in the Gulf!

Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

Gawain Jones returned to the UAE, bidding to retain his Dubai Open title

Having won last year’s Dubai Open, Gawain Jones returned to the United Arab Emirates to defend his title, but first in late March he elected to warm up at the Sharjah Masters, a pretty strong Open at which Daniel King was the star commentator. Jones began with 4/4 and seemed at close to his best.

[Event "Sharjah Masters"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2017.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Jones, GC."]
[Black "Pichot, A."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B30"]
[PlyCount "63"]
[EventDate "2017.??.??"]
[SourceTitle "Chess 2017 #05"]
[SourceDate "2017.05.05"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 d5 4. exd5 Qxd5 5. d4 Bf5 {A slightly cheeky choice
from the Argentinean Grandmaster as Jones himself has done much to popularise
this line as Black.} 6. Be3 Nf6 ({White’s sixth was quite critical and here
Black also has} 6… cxd4 7. Nxd4 e6 {, after which} 8. Nd2 Nxd4 9. Bxd4 Ne7
10. Qb3 Nc6 11. Qxd5 exd5 12. Nf3 Bg4 13. Be2 {quickly fizzled out to a draw
after exchanges on f3 and d4 in Tan-Jones, British Championship, Bournemouth
2016.}) 7. Qb3 cxd4 8. Nxd4 ({At first} 8. Bc4 {might look pretty strong, but
actually after} Na5 $1 9. Bb5+ (9. Bxd5 Nxb3 10. Bxb3 dxe3 {regains the piece})
9… Kd8 10. Qxd5+ Nxd5 11. Nxd4 Bg6 {, Black seems to be fine thanks to his
threat to bag the bishop pair.}) 8… Nxd4 9. Bxd4 a6 10. Nd2 e6 11. Be2 O-O-O
$5 {A risky and new move.} ({Somewhat safer would have been} 11… Qxb3 12.
axb3 {, although then} O-O-O ({even} 12… Bd6 13. Nc4 Bc7 14. b4 {feels like
an edge for White}) 13. Nc4 Nd7 14. b4 {still favoured White in Potapov-Socko,
Moscow 2014.}) 12. Nc4 $5 ({Black would meet} 12. Bf3 {with} Qxb3 13. axb3 e5 {
;}) ({but} 12. Qc4+ $1 {and if} Kb8 13. Bf3 {was possible and the safest route
to an edge.}) 12… Bc5 $2 {Beginning to counter attack;} ({but Black should
really have bitten the bullet and gone in for} 12… Qxg2 13. O-O-O {. Jones
rather liked White here and it is true that Black’s dark squares and queenside
are pretty weak, but following, say,} Nd5 14. Ne5 Bd6 $1 {, matters don’t seem
at all clear.}) 13. O-O Be4 {Trying to attack while keeping lines closed.} (
13… Bxd4 14. cxd4 Kb8 (14… Qxd4 $2 15. Na5 Be4 16. Bxa6 $1 {is already
decisive}) 15. Rac1 Be4 16. Qe3 {would but leave the black king the much more
exposed of the two.}) 14. Rfd1 Qg5 15. g3 $1 (15. Bf1 {was also possible, but
the provocative text is even stronger, since Black’s attack can be contained
and meanwhile White’s bishop may yet be able to sacrifice itself on a6 one day.
}) 15… h5 $1 {Very natural and a move which contains a certain trap.} ({
The engines prefer} 15… Bxd4 16. cxd4 Kb8 {, but after} 17. Ne5 Bd5 18. Qd3 {
, White must be doing well thanks to the threat against f7.}) 16. Ne5 {
Continuing to go after the weak spot on f7 as the battle really heats up;} ({
while wisely avoiding} 16. h4 $2 Qf5 {which threatens a deadly invasion on h3.}
) 16… h4 $5 17. Nxf7 $1 {Greed, but also fine calculation.} ({Instead,} 17.
Qc4 $2 hxg3 $1 18. Qxc5+ Bc6 19. fxg3 $2 Rxh2 $1 {would have been curtains for
the beleaguered white king.}) 17… hxg3 18. fxg3 ({White needs his queen to
cover e3 should the bishops come off on d4 and, as such,} 18. Qxe6+ $2 Rd7 19.
fxg3 $2 ({even} 19. Qxe4 gxf2+ 20. Kh1 {favours Black after} Rxf7 21. Qe6+ Kb8
22. Qe5+ Qxe5 23. Bxe5+ Ka7) 19… Bxd4+ 20. Rxd4 Qe3+ 21. Kf1 Rxh2 {would not
have been wise.}) 18… Qf5 19. Qc4 $2 {Both sides have played extremely well
up to this point, but in such a a sharp position even the best can err.} ({
Jones rejected} 19. Nxd8 $2 {on account of} Bd5 20. Bc4 Rxh2 $1 {, when Black
has enough to force a draw, as with} 21. Qxb7+ Kxd8 22. Bxd5 Bxd4+ 23. Kxh2
Qh5+ 24. Kg2 Qe2+ {.}) ({However, the critical} 19. Nxh8 $1 Rxh8 20. Bxc5 {
would have won. Obviously only one black rook is now playing and} Qxc5+ (20…
Qh3 21. Kf2 $1 Qxh2+ 22. Ke1 Qxg3+ 23. Bf2 Rh1+ 24. Kd2 Rxd1+ 25. Rxd1 Qxf2 26.
Qxe6+ {sees White running away and then counterattacking just in the nick of
time}) 21. Rd4 e5 {is rebuffed by} 22. Qc4 {.}) 19… Qh3 $2 (19… Rxh2 $2 20.
Qxc5+ {would force the queens off and win;}) ({but Pichot might have got
something from his bold attacking play had he found} 19… Rxd4 $3 20. cxd4 (
20. Rxd4 Kb8 $1 {is very calm, but after} 21. Nxh8 b5 22. Qb3 Bd5 {, Black
seems to be fine according to the engines with …e5 next up – who needs rooks?
}) 20… Qh3 21. Qxc5+ Kb8 22. Qd6+ Ka7 {. White leads by a rook and just as
in the game should try to run away, but here after} 23. Kf2 Qg2+ 24. Ke3 Nd5+
25. Kd2 {, Black has a few ways to force a draw, including the extremely pretty
} Qxe2+ $1 26. Kxe2 Rxh2+ 27. Ke1 Rh1+ 28. Kd2 Rh2+ {, as spotted by Sam
Collins.}) 20. Qxc5+ Bc6 21. Bf3 $1 {According to Jones, this was the resource
Black had missed.} Rd5 $5 ({Now} 21… Qxh2+ 22. Kf1 Qh3+ 23. Ke2 {would see
the white king safely running away, but on Pichot fights…}) 22. Bxd5 Qxh2+
23. Kf1 exd5 24. Nxh8 {Well calculated;} ({having seen that} 24. Nxh8 Nd7 25.
Qe7 Bb5+ 26. Ke1 {leaves e2 covered and Black out of tricks.}) 24… Ne4 25.
Qf8+ Kd7 26. Qxg7+ Kc8 27. Qg4+ {Bringing the queen back is the easiest way to
win.} Kc7 28. Qf4+ Kc8 {Now Black comes up short and White soon takes over the
initiative;} ({but if} 28… Kd7 {, there’s} 29. Qxe4 $1 Bb5+ 30. Ke1 dxe4 31.
Bg1+ {.}) 29. Qf3 Bb5+ 30. Ke1 Ng5 31. Qf5+ Kc7 32. Be5+ 1-0

You must activate JavaScript to enhance chess game visualization.

See the rest of the article in the May issue of Chess Magazine available here.

The post Gawain in the Gulf! appeared first on Chess.co.uk.

Source: The Week in Chess

Search
Categories