Archive for October, 2012

R?dio Xadrez interviews GM Boris Gelfand

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

He became an icon in his country when he qualified, at 44, to play for the most desirable title of chess, the World Championship.

When most of the people predicted that his effort would be disappointing, he managed to draw the series of 12 classical games and, only in a tight tie-break, lose to his opponent Anand.

His passion for chess started early, when he got a book from his dad, at 4, in Belarus, where he was born. The book was written by Averbakh, called “Journey to the Kingdom of Chess”.

He studied in the talents school of the famous former World Champion GM Tigran Petrosian, whom he knew personally. “I remember Petrosian telling me: ‘never make a move without an idea! Even in blitz games, think!’”, he recalls. Later, moved to Israel, where he lives with his wife Maya and kids.

In the world’s top for more than 20 years and one of the most experienced and combative players of the recent times, winner of the Wijk aan Zee (1992), Biel (1992), Dos Hermanas (1994), Belgrade (1993 and 1995) and Pamplona (2004), apart from World Junior Championships.

R?dio Xadrez is proud to interview Israeli GM Boris Gelfand.

Boris Gelfand

Boris Gelfand

I think people nowadays are obsessed with getting on TV


RX: This year we had the visit of GM Judit Polg?r in Brazil, playing a tournament where in the first two rounds each player had 15 minutes, then there were two rounds of 30 minutes KO and then 5 more rounds of 1 hour KO. Would you play this kind of event if you were invited?

BG: I would be glad to play in Brazil if it would fit my tournament schedule.

RX: What do you know about Brazil and Brazilian chess players? When are you coming to Brazil?

BG: I like to talk with Giovanni Vescovi and Gilberto Milos. They are very nice and cultured people. I had played with Giovanni 5 times. Once I spoke with Henrique Mecking. I’ve never been to Brazil and I would like to visit your country. I’ve heard a lot about its beautiful nature, unique culture, fine food and great football!

RX: Many people say that the only chance for chess to be on TV is to broadcast rapid or blitz matches. Do you think this is possible in the near future?

BG: I think people nowadays are obsessed with getting on TV. I’m certain that the modern technologies, especially internet, are extremely suitable for chess and the organizers should use them in a clever and effective way to promote chess around the globe and to give chess fans the best commentaries, lessons, opportunities to play each other etc.

RX: Do you have a Twitter or Facebook account?

BG: No, I prefer to spend my time on chess preparation and with my family.

RX: Is there a special game for you?

BG: It is hard to choose. Many of my best games were included into my book, published in English language in 2004. Since then I’ve played more interesting games. So I cannot say which is my favorite game.

Boris Gelfand

Chess became more popular in Israel after the Match


RX: What do you think was missing in your play so that you could beat Anand?

BG: I think it was lack of precision in some decisive moments and lack of luck on tiebreak.

RX: Anand had offered a draw for you after his move a2-a3 in one of the games. You said that this move was not a very good one to offer a draw. What is a very good move to offer a draw?

BG: [In this game,] 25.Re1 was a better move [to offer a draw], as after 25.a3 I could keep on playing, even though without any chances to win the game.

RX: Is there still time to become a World Champion?

BG: Yes, sure.

RX (submitted by reader Renato Quintiliano): I was rooting to you in the match against Anand. I would like to know if you feel too much pressure in a match or if you are already used to it? And finally, I want to ask how you felt when you beat Anand, breaking a series of draws?

BG: Of course it was a nice feeling to win the 7th game in a style of my favorite player: Akiba Rubinstein. I hope this game will be studied by many fans. I had deeply annotated it for a few magazines.

RX (submitted by reader Daniel Ikejiri): Is chess popular in Israel? Are you an idol in your country or are you not well-known like Brazilian chess players?

BG: Chess became more popular in Israel after the Match. For example, the tie-break games were watched live by 10 percent of the population, including the Prime-Minister. All the news started with reports from the match. People often recognize me on the streets and wish me good luck. In more and more schools and even in the kinder gardens chess is an obligatory subject. Hopefully we can keep this momentum.

Kramnik and Aronian are the main trend setters


RX (submitted by reader Alberto Becker): At which point you felt you should take chess seriously? How was this decision to become a professional chess player?

BG: Actually, all the time I thought that chess had to become my profession. But after winning the Soviet Junior Championship in 1985 (ahead of Ivanchuk, among others) I realized that chess would be my profession.

Boris Gelfand

RX (submitted by reader Vazken Proudian): Everyone remembers Fischer’s and Kasparov’s love affair with the Sicilian Najdorf. The last decade was heavily influenced by Kramnik’s main choices: the Berlin, the Catalan etc. What is, in your opinion, the trend for the next decade? Which openings are becoming fashionable, and why? Who are the trend setters today?

BG: I think that Kramnik and Aronian are the main trend setters and I also try to do it [set opening trends]. It is hard to predict which opening will become fashionable, as computers now intervene into [opening] preparation and make it possible to prepare any opening in a limited amount of time.

RX: You said that your match against Anand was like the match Barcelona-Chelsea, right? Do you frequently watch football? What do you think about Corinthians-Chelsea in the end of the year?

BG: Yes, I am a big football fan and even a member of FC Barcelona. I haven’t watched Corinthians for a long time. Due to the time difference, they show Brazilian football here in the middle of the night. But I know that Brazil has a lot of young geniuses like Neimar, Ganso etc, and a lot of stars returned to Brazilian league in the last years.

RX: You said, for Chess Vibes, that Lady Gaga would never be invited to sing in the Tretyakov Gallery and that chess is played in a prestigious museum like there. It’s only an example or you think that Lady Gaga is not a great singer? What kind of music do you listen to?

BG: Yes, I think that chess is part of a high culture and not the pop culture. For example, the great modern pianist Denis Matsuev has agreed to play at the opening ceremony of my match with Anand and it was a great pleasure and honor for us. I myself prefer to listen to classical music and rock.

I think that many people over-estimate the meaning of Elo-points


RX: You once said that for you is more interesting and important to have a fight with a great player rather than calculate how many Elo points you would keep or lose. It’s amazing! But there are many players who do not think so. Excessive security or not playing for victory is killing chess of high-level nowadays?

BG: I think that many people over-estimate the meaning of Elo-points. I don’t think this is the most important in chess. I think that playing a quality game is much more important than to earn some more points. But I cannot agree with the assertion that modern chess is being killed. I think that modern chess is much more variable and interesting than 20-30 years ago. Just because a lot of new players raised around the globe and more tournaments are played nowadays with a lot of fantastic games.

RX: You said that it’s impossible to have many real friends. Who are your real friends in chess?

BG: I think that Levon Aronian is my good friend. And hope that he thinks the same.

RX: Thank you so much for the interview, Boris.

BG: Thank you for your and your reader’s questions. I hope my answers will be interesting for Brazilian chess fans. Looking forward to visit Brazil and see you.

Chessdom

The gender difference

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Keeping the queen off the chess board
Men and women competed separately in Eilat this month, raising questions about the need for a gender divide.

By Eli Shvidler | Oct.31, 2012 | 6:36 AM 
 
The European Chess Club Cup, which Eilat hosted earlier this month, boasted not only 34 men’s teams but also eight women’s teams. 
Although Judit Polgar, the highest ranked women’s chess player in the world, did not show up, the tournament did draw world champion Yifan Hou, 18, who won the title when she was just 16. Other prominent names included Humpy Koneru of India (No. 2 in the world ),  Slovenian Anna Muzychuk (No. 4 in the world) and European champion Valentina Gunina of Russia.
Although these women are all extremely talented, still they competed against each other and not the men. The World Chess Federation awards separate men’s and women’s titles. 
Why the gender divide? Do the women play less well than the men, and if so, why? Does it have to do with comprehension of the game, with being more emotional, impatient, naive? Or is due to inherent discrimination in the system? 
If change is going to come, Hou – the youngest world champion ever – is in good position to jump into the fray. She helped China win the team world championship by three points over runner-up Russia and added to her horde of medals an Olympic silver with her national team, as well as a second straight European Club Cup championship with the Monte Carlo. 
Hou participates in many men’s tournaments. She shared first place at one tournament in Gibraltar among a field of 55 male chess grandmasters – 11 of them with a rating of over 2,700 points. She told Haaretz that playing male grandmasters is an important opportunity to amass experience at the highest levels. 
There are clear differences between women’s chess and men’s chess, according to Hou. She says men’s strategic thinking is different from that of women, and that the men have more ideas. Women’s chess is more emotional, even suffering from excessive emotion, Hou says. She says that’s the reason it is good to mix in games against men with games against women. 
Still, the overall difference between men and women in Eilat was clear. The women players barely barely left the tables. Even Hou rarely allowed herself to get up, spending most of the time focused on the board. In contrast, the men took strolls and did not sit at the board when they weren’t mulling over the next move. 
Vitali Golod, coach of Israel’s national women’s chess team for the past seven years, says psychological preparation is essential for female players. He says half the battle is convincing them that everything is fine. 
Beyond that, it’s better to focus on a thoroughly rehearsed plan without piling on variations, Golod says, adding that it is very important for female players to have a plan that lets them obtain a good position on the board and attempt to guess which opening will be created in the game. Otherwise, there’s a risk of over-anxiety, he says. 
Golod believes when a woman loses it’s better not to go to her immediately but rather to wait a little to allow her to calm down. He says women usually don’t stay to analyze a game after it’s over, in contrast to male chess players. He says he’s asked women about this and they have told him they were sick of seeing their opponent’s face. He adds that women also tend to tire more quickly than men.
 
Man-beaters 
Judit Polgar, 36, and her two sisters demonstrate time and again that even if there is truth to what Hou and Golod say women can defeat men on the board. Sofia Polgar, the middle sister, recently played 17 men simultaneously and beat them all. 
The Polgars, a Jewish family from Hungary, have been associated with dominance and unrivaled quality in women’s chess for three decades. The trio’s father, Laszlo Polgar, is a psychologist who believes that geniuses are made, not born. 
Initially he forbade his daughters from playing against other women, which led the Hungarian Chess Federation to ban the family. After the ban was lifted the Polgar girls won the 1988 and 1990 Chess Olympics in Thessaloniki and Novi Sad, and took silver at the 1994 competition in Moscow. 
Judit, the youngest, is the only woman among the world’s top 10 chess players. She beat former world champions Gary Kasparov and Anatoly Karpov and continues to represent Hungary, on the men’s team. 
Susan (Zsuzsa ), at 43 the oldest of the sisters, is a former women’s world champion. 
Sofia, who is married to Yona Kosashvili, a Georgian-born Israeli who is a chess grandmaster in his own right, teaches chess and is working to increase the game’s popularity. She says there are several female chess players who can put up a fight against male players at the highest levels and that there is no reason for women to be inferior to men in chess. According to Sofia, the main differences are cultural and have to do with women’s commitments to their families, which have shortened or ended the careers of many female players. 
Sofia recalls that when Judit was eight or nine their family recognized that she had the makings of a champion. Judit’s way of thinking was different from most female chess players, Sofia says, adding that she displayed a sharp mind, a desire to take tactical positions and an approach devoid of excessive emotion. Judit is professional in every respect, says Sofia. The difference between her youngest sister and male chess players is that the burdens of raising children and other family duties fall mainly on her, as wonderful as her husband is. 
Although Sofia is married to a chess grandmaster she is barely active in the game, perhaps aware of the demands on a woman seeking to be among the top players in the world. She says that when they were young she and her sisters had to put in seven to eight hours a day on chess, working with and without professional coaches. 
The girls began beating their father at chess by the time they were eight, she adds.

 

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Abrahamyan Wins 9th Blitz Death Match!

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

This Sunday, Women’s Grandmaster Tatev Abrahamyan pulled off the biggest upset win of any Blitz Death Match to date when she defeated International Master Anna Zatonskih in what was one of the most viewed broadcasts in Chess.com/tv history!
With…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Chess caption

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

 
Can you create a clever caption?

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Chess trivia

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

 
Can you name this chess legend?

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Webster University – SPICE new website

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

 
The goal of SPICE is to work with our friends and colleagues to enhance chess, education, technology, and research. I strongly believe that College Chess is a critical bridge between Scholastic and Adult Chess. If we can successfully promote College Chess, we will retain a lot more of our scholastic players and transition them to Adult Chess.   

http://www.webster.edu/spice/


SPICE Mission
  • To be the premier center for chess education, research, technology, and outreach in the nation
  • To be a leader in promoting chess as a vehicle for enriching the education of children
  • To be a leader in promoting women’s chess
  • To recruit outstanding undergraduate and graduate students to Webster University
  • To bring national and international recognition to Webster University
  • To support and promote competitive chess at the college level
  • To support the nation’s most elite chess program

Webster University Chess Team 

No. 1 Ranked Division I Collegiate Chess Team in the U.S.

  • Grandmaster Georg Meier (Germany) / Co-Captain
  • Grandmaster Wesley So (Philippines)
  • Grandmaster Fidel Corrales Jimenez (Cuba)
  • Grandmaster Manuel Leon Hoyos (Mexico)
  • Grandmaster Ray Robson (USA)
  • Grandmaster Anatoly Bykhovsky (Israel) / Co-Captain
  • Grandmaster Denes Boros (Hungary)
  • Grandmaster Andre Diamant (Brazil)
  • International Master Vitaly Neimer (Israel)
  • FIDE master Jake Banawa (Philippines)
  • Women International Master Inna Agrest (Sweden)
  • Maraani Kamphorst (Brazil)
  • Vanita Young (USA)
  • Paul Michel Truong (USA)
Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Andreikin-Nepomniachtchi 6-game match

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Nepomniachtchi – Andreikin
Game 1 – October 30, 2012

Andreikin, a former SPICE Cup co-champion, is leading 1-0 with 5 more games to play.

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Houdini 3: el m?dulo m?s fuerte del mundo en la interfaz de Fritz

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

Noticias ChessBase

Italian Championship 2012

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

 
The Italian Chess Championship 2012 will be played at NH Hotel Ambasciatori (corso Vittorio Emanuele 104) in Torino from October 30th to November 10th. This is the first time that Torino is hosting this prestigious event. Twelve players will compete in the round robin tournament.

The four-time champion Fabiano Caruana – winner in 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2011 (in 2009 he didn’t play) – will not participate because he will play the Kings Tournament in Bucharest and then FIDE Grand Prix in Tashkent.

There are 4 Grandmasters in the field: Sabino Brunello, Alberto David, Carlos Garcia-Palermo and Michele Godena. Sabino Brunello, 23-years old, is the number two in the national elo list (1.10.2012) and the top seed in the Championship.

Alberto David, who was born in Milano but moved to Luxembourg with the family when he was 10-years old, returned to Italy and to the Italian Chess Federation and is now number 3 in the national elo list (1.10.2012), only one point behind Brunello.

Carlos Garcia-Palermo (58) is the oldest player; everybody remembers that he defeated Bobby Fischer in a simultaneous exhibition in 1970. Michele Godena (45) is the five-time Italian champion, winning his first title 20 years ago in Reggio Emilia 1992/93.

There are 6 International Masters in the competition: Fabio Bellini (43, Italian champion in 1999), Daniele Genocchio (31), Daniyyl Dvirnyy (22, last year he was second behind Caruana), Guido Caprio (only 18) and the two brothers Rombaldoni, Denis (23) and Axel (20, he already got two GM norms).

The field is completed with the two young players, both 17 and both Fide Masters: Simone De Filomeno and Nicola Altini.

The arbiters are IA Marco Santandrea from Milano and FA Roberto Ricca from Torino.

Live games on the web site www.federscacchi.it

Results, standing, bulletin on the web site www.scacchisticatorinese.it

News by Adolivio Capece

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Italian Chess Championship 2012

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

The Italian Chess Championship 2012 will be played at NH Hotel Ambasciatori (corso Vittorio Emanuele 104) in Torino from October 30th to November 10th. This is the first time that Torino is hosting this prestigious event. Twelve players will compete in the round robin tournament.

The four-time champion Fabiano Caruana – winner in 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2011 (in 2009 he didn’t play) – will not participate because he will play the Kings Tournament in Bucharest and then FIDE Grand Prix in Tashkent.

There are 4 Grandmasters in the field: Sabino Brunello, Alberto David, Carlos Garcia-Palermo and Michele Godena. Sabino Brunello, 23-years old, is the number two in the national elo list (1.10.2012) and the top seed in the Championship.

Sabino Brunello

Sabino Brunello

Alberto David, who was born in Milano but moved to Luxembourg with the family when he was 10-years old, returned to Italy and to the Italian Chess Federation and is now number 3 in the national elo list (1.10.2012), only one point behind Brunello.

Carlos Garcia-Palermo (58) is the oldest player; everybody remembers that he defeated Bobby Fischer in a simultaneous exhibition in 1970. Michele Godena (45) is the five-time Italian champion, winning his first title 20 years ago in Reggio Emilia 1992/93.

Michele Godena

Michele Godena

There are 6 International Masters in the competition: Fabio Bellini (43, Italian champion in 1999), Daniele Genocchio (31), Daniyyl Dvirnyy (22, last year he was second behind Caruana), Guido Caprio (only 18) and the two brothers Rombaldoni, Denis (23) and Axel (20, he already got two GM norms).

The field is completed with the two young players, both 17 and both Fide Masters: Simone De Filomeno and Nicola Altini.

The arbiters are IA Marco Santandrea from Milano and FA Roberto Ricca from Torino.

Alberto David

Alberto David

Live games on the web site www.federscacchi.it

Results, standing, bulletin on the web site www.scacchisticatorinese.it

News by Adolivio Capece

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