Archive for October, 2012

Happy Halloween!

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

From ghoulies and ghosties
And long-leggedy beasties
And things that go bump in the night
May you have a fun evening of fright
 
Happy Halloween!

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

?Por qu? el ajedrez es tan dif?cil? (II)

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Noticias ChessBase

Grandmasters So, Meier Headline Thanksgiving Open in Saint Louis

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Saint Louis (October 31, 2012) – Grandmaster Wesley So of the Philippines and Grandmaster Georg Meier of Germany headline the strongest field in the history of the Thanksgiving Open, scheduled to be held at the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis November 23-25.

This FIDE-rated event features a guaranteed prize fund of more than $10,000.

Thanksgiving Open in Saint Louis

The featured titled players that have committed as of October 31 include:
GM Wesley So
GM Georg Meier
GM Anatoly Bykhovsky
GM Fidel Corrales
GM Ben Finegold
GM Andre Diamant
GM Denes Boros
WGM Anna Sharevich
IM Steven Zierk
IM Priyadharshan Kannappan
IM Mac Molner
IM Justin Sarkar
IM Vitaly Neimer
IM Levan Bregadze
IM Angelo Young

The tournament features two-day and three-day options and three separate sections: Open (FIDE rated), U1800 and U1400. For more information or to register, click this link.

Immediately following the Thanksgiving Open, the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis will host the 2012 CCSCSL Invitational, a GM and IM norm event.

The GM Invitational will take place November 26-30, and will feature the following line-up:

GM Ben Finegold: USA 2493
GM Denes Boros: HUN 2492
GM Andre Diamant: BRA 2471
IM Mac Molner: USA 2489
IM Darwin Yang: USA 2485
IM Steven Zierk: USA 2483
IM Marc Esserman: USA 2445
IM Justin Sarkar: USA 2408
IM Priyadharshan Kannappan: IND 2407
IM Vitaly Niemer: ISR 2373

Tournament organizers expect players will need to score 6.5/9 to secure a GM norm.

The field features a number of strong contenders for norms. Both Zierk and Yang are perennial Junior Championship participants, and Kannappan has turned in an unparalleled performance in the U.S. Chess League, securing the MVP title with three weeks left in the regular season.

Neimer recently earned a GM norm with a superb performance at this year’s SPICE Cup, which was held in Saint Louis this past week, and Esserman just wrote a thoroughly ground-breaking work in the Morra Gambit Sicilian published by Quality Chess.

The IM norm event will be held in conjunction with the GM norm event. A complete list of players is being finalized, so stay tuned for more details.

Since its inception in 2007, the CCSCSL has worked to promote chess locally and nationally by offering lessons and classes at its world-class facility, bringing chess programming to schools all across the greater Saint Louis area and by hosting major events like the U.S. Championships, international matches between the world’s best players and special training camps for the country’s top talent.

Hosting GM and IM norm events allows us to provide even more opportunities for U.S. chess players to bring their game to the next level.

For more information about the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis, visit www.saintlouischessclub.org.

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R?dio Xadrez interviews GM Boris Gelfand

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

 
He became an icon in his country when he qualified, at 44, to play for the most desirable title of chess, the World Championship.

When most of the people predicted that his effort would be disappointing, he managed to draw the series of 12 classical games and, only in a tight tie-break, lose to his opponent Anand.

His passion for chess started early, when he got a book from his dad, at 4, in Belarus, where he was born. The book was written by Averbakh, called “Journey to the Kingdom of Chess”.

He studied in the talents school of the famous former World Champion GM Tigran Petrosian, whom he knew personally. “I remember Petrosian telling me: ‘never make a move without an idea! Even in blitz games, think!’”, he recalls. Later, moved to Israel, where he lives with his wife Maya and kids.

In the world’s top for more than 20 years and one of the most experienced and combative players of the recent times, winner of the Wijk aan Zee (1992), Biel (1992), Dos Hermanas (1994), Belgrade (1993 and 1995) and Pamplona (2004), apart from World Junior Championships.

R?dio Xadrez is proud to interview Israeli GM Boris Gelfand.
  
I think people nowadays are obsessed with getting on TV

RX: This year we had the visit of GM Judit Polg?r in Brazil, playing a tournament where in the first two rounds each player had 15 minutes, then there were two rounds of 30 minutes KO and then 5 more rounds of 1 hour KO. Would you play this kind of event if you were invited?

BG: I would be glad to play in Brazil if it would fit my tournament schedule.

RX: What do you know about Brazil and Brazilian chess players? When are you coming to Brazil?

BG: I like to talk with Giovanni Vescovi and Gilberto Milos. They are very nice and cultured people. I had played with Giovanni 5 times. Once I spoke with Henrique Mecking. I’ve never been to Brazil and I would like to visit your country. I’ve heard a lot about its beautiful nature, unique culture, fine food and great football!

RX: Many people say that the only chance for chess to be on TV is to broadcast rapid or blitz matches. Do you think this is possible in the near future?

BG: I think people nowadays are obsessed with getting on TV. I’m certain that the modern technologies, especially internet, are extremely suitable for chess and the organizers should use them in a clever and effective way to promote chess around the globe and to give chess fans the best commentaries, lessons, opportunities to play each other etc.

RX: Do you have a Twitter or Facebook account?

BG: No, I prefer to spend my time on chess preparation and with my family.

RX: Is there a special game for you?

BG: It is hard to choose. Many of my best games were included into my book, published in English language in 2004. Since then I’ve played more interesting games. So I cannot say which is my favorite game.
  
Chess became more popular in Israel after the Match

RX: What do you think was missing in your play so that you could beat Anand?

BG: I think it was lack of precision in some decisive moments and lack of luck on tiebreak.

RX: Anand had offered a draw for you after his move a2-a3 in one of the games. You said that this move was not a very good one to offer a draw. What is a very good move to offer a draw?

BG: [In this game,] 25.Re1 was a better move [to offer a draw], as after 25.a3 I could keep on playing, even though without any chances to win the game.

RX: Is there still time to become a World Champion?

BG: Yes, sure.

RX (submitted by reader Renato Quintiliano): I was rooting to you in the match against Anand. I would like to know if you feel too much pressure in a match or if you are already used to it? And finally, I want to ask how you felt when you beat Anand, breaking a series of draws?

BG: Of course it was a nice feeling to win the 7th game in a style of my favorite player: Akiba Rubinstein. I hope this game will be studied by many fans. I had deeply annotated it for a few magazines.

RX (submitted by reader Daniel Ikejiri): Is chess popular in Israel? Are you an idol in your country or are you not well-known like Brazilian chess players?

BG: Chess became more popular in Israel after the Match. For example, the tie-break games were watched live by 10 percent of the population, including the Prime-Minister. All the news started with reports from the match. People often recognize me on the streets and wish me good luck. In more and more schools and even in the kinder gardens chess is an obligatory subject. Hopefully we can keep this momentum.

Kramnik and Aronian are the main trend setters

RX (submitted by reader Alberto Becker): At which point you felt you should take chess seriously? How was this decision to become a professional chess player?

BG: Actually, all the time I thought that chess had to become my profession. But after winning the Soviet Junior Championship in 1985 (ahead of Ivanchuk, among others) I realized that chess would be my profession.

RX (submitted by reader Vazken Proudian): Everyone remembers Fischer’s and Kasparov’s love affair with the Sicilian Najdorf. The last decade was heavily influenced by Kramnik’s main choices: the Berlin, the Catalan etc. What is, in your opinion, the trend for the next decade? Which openings are becoming fashionable, and why? Who are the trend setters today?

BG: I think that Kramnik and Aronian are the main trend setters and I also try to do it [set opening trends]. It is hard to predict which opening will become fashionable, as computers now intervene into [opening] preparation and make it possible to prepare any opening in a limited amount of time.

RX: You said that your match against Anand was like the match Barcelona-Chelsea, right? Do you frequently watch football? What do you think about Corinthians-Chelsea in the end of the year?

BG: Yes, I am a big football fan and even a member of FC Barcelona. I haven’t watched Corinthians for a long time. Due to the time difference, they show Brazilian football here in the middle of the night. But I know that Brazil has a lot of young geniuses like Neimar, Ganso etc, and a lot of stars returned to Brazilian league in the last years.

RX: You said, for Chess Vibes, that Lady Gaga would never be invited to sing in the Tretyakov Gallery and that chess is played in a prestigious museum like there. It’s only an example or you think that Lady Gaga is not a great singer? What kind of music do you listen to?

BG: Yes, I think that chess is part of a high culture and not the pop culture. For example, the great modern pianist Denis Matsuev has agreed to play at the opening ceremony of my match with Anand and it was a great pleasure and honor for us. I myself prefer to listen to classical music and rock.

I think that many people over-estimate the meaning of Elo-points

RX: You once said that for you is more interesting and important to have a fight with a great player rather than calculate how many Elo points you would keep or lose. It’s amazing! But there are many players who do not think so. Excessive security or not playing for victory is killing chess of high-level nowadays?

BG: I think that many people over-estimate the meaning of Elo-points. I don’t think this is the most important in chess. I think that playing a quality game is much more important than to earn some more points. But I cannot agree with the assertion that modern chess is being killed. I think that modern chess is much more variable and interesting than 20-30 years ago. Just because a lot of new players raised around the globe and more tournaments are played nowadays with a lot of fantastic games.

RX: You said that it’s impossible to have many real friends. Who are your real friends in chess?

BG: I think that Levon Aronian is my good friend. And hope that he thinks the same.

RX: Thank you so much for the interview, Boris.

BG: Thank you for your and your reader’s questions. I hope my answers will be interesting for Brazilian chess fans. Looking forward to visit Brazil and see you.

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

1st India National School Chess Championships – Velammal School steals the show

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

 
1st India National School Chess Championships – Velammal School steals the show

New Delhi (31 Oct 12): Velammal Matriculation Higher Secondary School Chennai bagged the major share of medals in the 1st National School Chess Championship here at Ludlow Castle Sports Complex, Civil Lines on Wednesday. 

Velammal made a clean sweep in the Under-17 and Under-15 categories of team championship while in Under-13 and Under-9 categories they secured pole position. In the individual championship also most of the medals were bagged by the Velammal students and showed their supremacy in the premier edition of the meet. 

In all over 600 School children participated in the various individual categories starting from Under-5 age group to the under-17 age group

There were total of 14 categories in boys and girls section and the Chennai school naturally hogged the limelight. 

The supremacy of the players of Vellamal school was especially evident in the team championship of under-15 and under-17 section wherein they won all medals at stake. 

The host city had something to cheer about in the under-5 category wherein Garv Rai of Modern School Vasant Vihar won the Gold medal. 

Amongst other aspirants in the city, Nishant Malhotra of Balbharti School Dwarka won the Silver medal in the under-17 open category, Manan Rai of Amity International secured the same medal in under-13 section, Sarthak Mahajan won Silver in under-15 while Aansh Gupta had a similar result in under-11 category. 

Amongst other local hopefuls in the fray, Manpreet Singh, Harshal Shahi, Aarchi Agarwal and Abir Sinha won Bronze medal in their respective categories. 

Medal Winners Individual Championship (Gold, Silver & Bronze):

Under-5 Open: Garv Rai, Ryan Priyank & Chandrani Shlok
Under-5 Girls: Yashavishree N, Prathivya Gupta & Savitha Shri B
Under-7 Open: Praggnandandhaa R, Leon Mendonca & Mahitosh Dey
Under-7 Girls: Chinnam Vyshanvi, Wankhade Sanskruti & Divya Deshmukh
Under-9 Open: Harshvardhan G B, Raja Rithvik R & Manpreet Singh
Under-9 Girls: Salonika Saina, Garima Gaurav & Manya Bagla
Under-11 Open: Siva Mahadevan, Aansh Gupta & Rajdeep Sarkar
Under-11 Girls: Vaishali R, Bidhar Rutumbara & Archi Agrawal
Under-13 Open: Karthikeyan Murali, Manan Rai & Harshal Shahi
Under-13 Girls: Shiny Das, Manasa H R & Dakshinya TRS
Under-15 Open: Barath L, Sarthak Mahajan & Senthil Maran K
Under-15 Girls: Monnisha G K, Varshini V & Sandya M
Under-17 Open: Chaithanyaa K G, Nishant Malhotra & Abir Sinha
Under-17 Girls: Anjana Krishna S, Hema Priya N & Akshaya Nandakumar

Delhi Chess Association

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

The importance of Social Media

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

Dr. Beth Stroble, President of Webster University
 
President Stroble and Webster as Social Media Leader in Higher Ed 
Posted: 31 Oct 2012 09:09 AM PDT 

Dr. Elizabeth (Beth) J. Stroble was named President of Webster University in 2009. Stroble leads a unique institution, consisting of a home campus in Webster Groves, MO, and 100 more locations in the U.S. and around the world. More than 22,000 students, ranging from traditional-age students to adults are enrolled in Webster’s programs.

Before coming to Webster, Stroble served as senior vice president and provost and COO at the University of Akron. She tweets as @WebsterPres.

What prompted you to begin using social media for communicating with your constituents?
I became the president at Webster in the summer of 2009 and I immediately started thinking about how I could communicate with people at this unique institution. I wanted to find a way to communicate who I am as president: it’s a new role for me.

I wondered what would work for me, how I could tell stories about Webster. Then in fall of 2009, we hosted Jack Dorsey [@Jack, the founder of Twitter and Square]. I sat in the audience listening to him and a lightbulb went off for me. I realized that Twitter was what I was looking for.

I was an early email user — in fact, I wrote my dissertation on instructional uses of email — and I saw Twitter as better than email for the purpose of community-building, which is what I wanted. Within a day, I secured @WebsterPres on Twitter. I don’t feel as if I know a lot about what you can do with Twitter. But it works well for what I need it to do. It’s a great tool that cuts across boundaries — time, geography, which are important here at Webster. And Twitter is a great equalizer — anyone can feel OK about communicating with anyone else on Twitter.

I also use Facebook. I used to use Twitter more, but for a while now I’ve been posting on Facebook more frequently. I can do better with photos on Facebook — and I can also use Insights tracking to see what photos get more interest. And of course some stories and some thoughts just can’t be constrained to 140 characters.

The audience on Facebook is more of an internal audience — students, faculty, and staff. The Twitter audience is more distributed — it includes folks in highered, reporters and media, and others outside the university and they don’t tend to follow me on Facebook. So, for example, if I want to talk about how Webster people are welcoming back students, I’ll share that on Facebook because my followers there will be more interested.

How do you manage it?

I had a staff member here who had sometimes tweeted for me. She’s no longer with us, so I’ve been doing more of the tweeting, and I feel comfortable doing this myself. She and I were on the same wave-length and a partnership worked as I was beginning to use social media.

Have you found that your presence on Twitter has enabled you to make unexpected connections, especially those that you wouldn’t have made otherwise?

I think that has happened with Twitter, though it’s often hard to trace the path of those connections. I’d say that for Webster as a whole, our social media presence has put us on the map in higher ed and that would have been hard to achieve in any other way. For example, I’ve been invited to blog for the Huffington Post as a result of our social media presence.

Here’s another example of where Twitter has helped, our chess team is very successful and uses social media extensively. Once I started retweeting some of their stories, I started to be followed by members of the chess community. So what you retweet bounces you out into communities where you haven’t been before. Many of those people are international, and that helps Webster: we want more of a presence internationally.

Why is that important?

As president, I need to be out in the external environment interacting with many different constituents — government leaders, economic development officials, presidents and others in higher ed. It’s important for me to transmit what I hear from them to the Webster community so that we can identify opportunities to transform our university. At the same time, I’m gathering our stories about what’s happening at Webster and sharing them with the broader world, so people there can see how we’re taking action and can help us to further our mission. This is a fundamental part of my job.

Twitter is great because it’s easy to use when I’m out and about. It’s fun and I get a kick out of it.

Are there institutions where it would be difficult for the president to use social media?

Well, there could be. It’s easy here: the eclectic, engaging, social way Webster lives makes this fertile ground for social media.

I do feel comfortable sharing some personal information occasionally: part of my brand is a personal and professional blend. I won’t post very personal things on Twitter: I’m aware that I’m always posting as Beth Stroble, the president. So I’ll share photos of my family occasionally, but I won’t go into great detail into my personal opinions about things. If I wanted to do that, I’d use a different Twitter feed, not @WebsterPres.

So I think that calculation would be different for a different kind of institution. At some kinds of institutions, being out there on social channels could start a difficult conversation online.

And that’s part of the anonymity that comes with lack of face-to-face contact with any technology-enabled communication tool — even the phone. Unless you’re face to face, you can’t be sure who you’re talking with, so you can’t be naive about using technology. It’s really important for presidents not to overlook the mistakes that could be made in thinking that the informality of social media means you don’t have to think about what you say and choose your words carefully. 

Source: http://eduniverse.org

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

November 2012 FRL

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

official_logo
FIDE publishes November 2012 FIDE Rating List. The list of top players is published at Top lists page of FIDE ratings website. All players can check new ratings at the main page of FIDE ratings website.

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Making the club scene: Strong Euro Cup chess lineups

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

With so many hired guns in the competition, it’s little wonder the annual European Club Cup team championship features some of the strongest firepower of any club tournament in the world. This year’s championship, played in the Israeli city of Eilat, was won by the SOCAR Azerbaijan team, whose all-2700-plus lineup included former U.S. chess champion Gata Kamsky, Russian chess star Alexander Grischuk and Azerbaijani GMs Shahkriyar Mamedyarov and Teimour Radjabov. SOCAR had to overcome a Round 1 upset by the ninth-seeded Israeli chess squad Ashdod, anchored by Ukrainian super GM Vassily Ivanhcuk, trouncing the Russian club team Tomsk-400 5-1 in the seventh and final round to win the chess event on …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

Real game tactic

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

 
White to move. What is the best continuation for white?

Source: ChessToday.net

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

7 Webster University students to participate in the Thanksgiving Open

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012
Webster University GMs So, Meier Headline Thanksgiving Open in Saint Louis

SAINT LOUIS (October 31, 2012) — Grandmaster Wesley So of the Philippines and Grandmaster Georg Meier of Germany headline the strongest field in the history of the Thanksgiving Open, scheduled to be held at the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis November 23-25. This FIDE-rated event features a guaranteed prize fund of more than $10,000.

The featured titled players that have committed as of October 31 include:

GM Wesley So (Webster University freshman)

GM Georg Meier (Webster University sophomore)
GM Anatoly Bykhovsky
(Webster University junior)
GM Fidel Corrales
(Webster University freshman)
GM Ben Finegold
GM Andre Diamant
(Webster University sophomore)
GM Denes Boros
(Webster University junior)
WGM Anna Sharevich
IM Steven Zierk
IM Priyadharshan Kannappan
IM Mac Molner
IM Justin Sarkar
IM Vitaly Neimer
(Webster University sophomore)
IM Levan Bregadze
IM Angelo Young

The tournament features two-day and three-day options and three separate sections: Open (FIDE rated), U1800 and U1400. For more information or to register, click this link.

Immediately following the Thanksgiving Open, the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis will host the 2012 CCSCSL Invitational, a GM and IM norm event.
The GM Invitational will take place November 26-30, and will feature the following line-up:

GM Ben Finegold: USA 2493
GM Denes Boros: HUN 2492
(Webster University junior)
GM Andre Diamant: BRA 2471
(Webster University sophomore)
IM Mac Molner: USA 2489
IM Darwin Yang: USA 2485
IM Steven Zierk: USA 2483
IM Marc Esserman: USA 2445
IM Justin Sarkar: USA 2408
IM Priyadharshan Kannappan: IND 2407
IM Vitaly Niemer: ISR 2373
(Webster University sophomore)

Tournament organizers expect players will need to score 6.5/9 to secure a GM norm.

The field features a number of strong contenders for norms. Both Zierk and Yang are perennial Junior Championship participants, and Kannappan has turned in an unparalleled performance in the U.S. Chess League, securing the MVP title with three weeks left in the regular season. Neimer recently earned a GM norm with a superb performance at this year’s SPICE Cup, which was held in Saint Louis this past week, and Esserman just wrote a thoroughly ground-breaking work in the Morra Gambit Sicilian published by Quality Chess.

The IM norm event will be held in conjunction with the GM norm event. A complete list of players is being finalized, so stay tuned for more details.

Since its inception in 2007, the CCSCSL has worked to promote chess locally and nationally by offering lessons and classes at its world-class facility, bringing chess programming to schools all across the greater Saint Louis area and by hosting major events like the U.S. Championships, international matches between the world’s best players and special training camps for the country’s top talent.

Hosting GM and IM norm events allows us to provide even more opportunities for U.S. chess players to bring their game to the next level.

For more information about the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis, visit www.saintlouischessclub.org.

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

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