Archive for September, 2012

Magnus at the top of the world

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

Magnus Carlsen and Levon Aronian have a firm grip on the top 2 spots in the rating chart. There are a total of 51 players over 2700!
 
1 Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2843 
2 Aronian, Levon g ARM 2821 

3 Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2795 
4 Radjabov, Teimour g AZE 2792 
5 Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 2786 
6 Karjakin, Sergey g RUS 2780 
7 Anand, Viswanathan g IND 2780 
8 Caruana, Fabiano g ITA 2772 
9 Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 2771 
10 Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 2758 
11 Kamsky, Gata g USA 2755 
12 Grischuk, Alexander g RUS 2752 
13 Topalov, Veselin g BUL 2751 
14 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar g AZE 2748 
15 Wang, Hao g CHN 2748 
16 Svidler, Peter g RUS 2747 
17 Gashimov, Vugar g AZE 2737 
18 Gelfand, Boris g ISR 2736 
19 Ponomariov, Ruslan g UKR 2735 
20 Dominguez Perez, Leinier g CUB 2734 
21 Leko, Peter g HUN 2734 
22 Wojtaszek, Radoslaw g POL 2733 
23 Jakovenko, Dmitry g RUS 2732 
24 Giri, Anish g NED 2730 
25 Volokitin, Andrei g UKR 2724 
26 Navara, David g CZE 2722 
27 Adams, Michael g ENG 2720 
28 Tomashevsky, Evgeny g RUS 2720 
29 Shirov, Alexei g LAT 2718 
30 Andreikin, Dmitry g RUS 2718 
31 Bruzon Batista, Lazaro g CUB 2717 
32 Malakhov, Vladimir g RUS 2713 
33 McShane, Luke J g ENG 2713 
34 Riazantsev, Alexander g RUS 2712 
35 Cheparinov, Ivan g BUL 2710 
36 Areshchenko, Alexander g UKR 2710 
37 Jobava, Baadur g GEO 2710 
38 Almasi, Zoltan g HUN 2707 
39 Short, Nigel D g ENG 2707 
40 Polgar, Judit g HUN 2705 
41 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime g FRA 2705 
42 Bacrot, Etienne g FRA 2705 
43 Korobov, Anton g UKR 2705 
44 Naiditsch, Arkadij g GER 2704 
45 Nepomniachtchi, Ian g RUS 2704 
46 Le, Quang Liem g VIE 2703 
47 Akopian, Vladimir g ARM 2703 
48 Ding, Liren g CHN 2702 
49 Fressinet, Laurent g FRA 2702 
50 Vallejo Pons, Francisco g ESP 2700 
51 Moiseenko, Alexander g UKR 2700

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Humpy back as the top (non-Polgar) in the world

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

October 2012 rating list
 
1 Polgar, Judit g HUN 2705 

2 Koneru, Humpy g IND 2607 
3 Hou, Yifan g CHN 2605 

4 Muzychuk, Anna g SLO 2587 
5 Zhao, Xue g CHN 2565 
6 Dzagnidze, Nana g GEO 2555 
7 Lahno, Kateryna g UKR 2551 
8 Kosintseva, Nadezhda g RUS 2539 
9 Cmilyte, Viktorija g LTU 2528 
10 Sebag, Marie g FRA 2521 
11 Kosintseva, Tatiana g RUS 2515 
12 Gunina, Valentina m RUS 2514 
13 Cramling, Pia g SWE 2514 
14 Harika, Dronavalli g IND 2512 
15 Khotenashvili, Bela m GEO 2504 
16 Ruan, Lufei wg CHN 2501 

17 Zatonskih, Anna m USA 2499 
18 Ju, Wenjun wg CHN 2498 
19 Stefanova, Antoaneta g BUL 2493 
20 Zhu, Chen g QAT 2491 

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

SPICE Cup 2012 officially the highest rated event in US history!

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

The October 2012 World Chess rating list has just been published (http://ratings.fide.com/toplist.phtml). 

The 2012 SPICE Cup Invitational at Webster University is now officially the highest rated International Invitational Round Robin tournament in U.S. history, breaking the record of the past 2 SPICE Cup (2010 and 2011 which were category 17). The 2012 Invitational is a category 18 tournament.

GM Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (France) 2705
GM Le Quang Liem (Vietnam) 2703
GM Ding Liren (China) 2702
GM Wesley So (Philippines) 2677
GM Csaba Balogh (Hungary) 2664
GM Georg Meier (Germany) 2646

Average: 2683

The Webster University – SPICE Grandmasters with 5 players over 2600!


This is also a historic occurrence in college chess. No university has ever had 8 grandmasters enrolling in full time study at once. In fact, no university has even come close to this mark (4 was the most by any other university). In addition, no university in the United States has ever had 5 players with ratings over 2600!

GM Wesley So (Philippines) 2677

GM Georg Meier (Germany) 2646
GM Fidel Corrales Jimenez (Cuba) 2605
GM Manuel Leon Hoyos (Mexico) 2603
GM Ray Robson (USA) 2602
GM Anatoly Bykhovsky (Israel) 2522
GM Denes Boros (Hungary) 2492
GM Andre Diamant (Brazil) 2471

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

On Chess: Game not as hard as many think

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

Chess has an undeniable mystique. It is often thought to be the game of games — too difficult to master and best admired from afar. In fact, the rules are quite simple. It’s possible to learn them in less than a half-hour. Expertise is largely a matter of familiarity and practice. With only modest guidance, it’s possible to advance significantly from the beginning stage. Even advanced chess skills aren’t as difficult as one would think. In his book Lasker’s Manual of Chess, Emanuel Lasker (1868-1941) — a world chess champion, creative mathematician and philosopher — expressed his conviction that a young chess player, “even if he possesses no talent for chess,” can attain master strength with a mere 200 hours of application. How is …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

October 2012 FIDE Rating List

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

FIDE have published the official October 2012 chess rating list (September list here). The list only includes results from completed tournaments that have been submitted to FIDE in time to be included in the calculations.
Results from tournaments…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

Accidental victory?

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

Did a Computer Bug Help Deep Blue Beat Kasparov?
By Klint Finley 
September 28, 2012 | 6:30 pm

 

In May 1997, an IBM supercomputer known as Deep Blue beat then chess world champion Garry Kasparov, who had once bragged he would never lose to a machine.
Kasparov and other chess masters blamed the defeat on a single move made by the IBM machine. Either at the end of the first game or the beginning of the second, depending on who’s telling the story, the computer made a sacrifice that seemed to hint at its long-term strategy.
Kasparov and many others thought the move was too sophisticated for a computer, suggesting there had been some sort of human intervention during the game. “It was an incredibly refined move, of defending while ahead to cut out any hint of countermoves,” grandmaster Yasser Seirawan told Wired in 2001, “and it sent Garry into a tizzy.”
Fifteen years later, one of Big Blue’s designers says the move was the result of a bug in Deep Blue’s software.
The revelation was published in a book by statistician and New York Times journalist Nate Silver titled The Signal and the Noise — and promptly highlighted by Ezra Klein of the Washington Post.
For his book, Silver interviewed Murray Campbell, one of the three IBM computer scientists who designed Deep Blue, and Murray told him that the machine was unable to select a move and simply picked one at random.
At the time, Deep Blue versus Kasparov was hailed as a seminal moment in the history of computer science — and lamented as a humiliating defeat for the human intellect. But it may have just been a lesson that as humans, we tend to blow things way out of proportion.
Many chess masters have long claimed that Kasparov was at a significant disadvantage during the match. Deep Blue’s designers had the opportunity to tweak Deep Blue’s programming between matches to adapt to Kasparov’s style and strategy. They also had access to the full history of his previous public matches.
Kasparov had no similar record of Big Blue’s performance. Because the machine had been heavily modified since he had last played it, he was essentially going in blind. That strange move was chalked up to these advantages.
The IBM team did tweak the algorithms between games, but part of what they were doing was fixing the bug that resulted in that unexpected move. The machine made a mistake, then they made sure it wouldn’t do it again. The irony is that the move had messed with Kasporav’s mind, and there was no one to fix this bug.
“Kasparov had concluded that the counter intuitive play must be a sign of superior intelligence,” Campbell told Silver. “He had never considered that it was simply a bug.”
It’s tempting to think there’s a lesson here about human nature. After all, a human mistake in the development of the software led to the machine’s victory. It’s sort of reassuring to think that a human flaw is actually what made Deep Blue successful. But it’s not clear that things would have turned out all that differently had that bug never surfaced.
Years after the final Deep Blue match, both Kasparov and Vladimir Kramnik, his successor as world chess champion, played against various versions of Deep Blue’s successor Fritz. But in these matches, no code modifications were permitted between games. Kramnik even had the chance to play against the software in advance of the matches, and had the right to adjourn a game until the next if it went past 56 moves.
The results aren’t that encouraging for humans.
Kasparov’s match against X3D Frintz in 2003ended in a draw. So did Kramnik’s first match against Fritz in 2002. And Kramnik lost to Fritz due to a blunder in 2006.
These weren’t decisive victories for the machines, but the humans still couldn’t win. Even though humans can conceive of strategies to counteract the computation advantage of computers, we get tired, make blunders, and suffer from anxiety. Machines never get tired or flustered.
But the relationship between chess players and computers is actually more symbiotic than adversarial. Today’s chess masters use computers extensively as learning aids.
That said, today’s computers make Deep Blue look puny. Maybe it’s time for a rematch. 

Source: http://www.wired.com

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Moving the show to Bilbao

Sunday, September 30th, 2012


The Italian, with 10 points, will start the second round in Bilbao, on October 8th, with an advantage of 5 points over the Armenian and 6 over Carlsen.
Day 5th Results:

- Aronian (Armenia) (w) – Caruana (Italy) (b) 1-1 (duration: 4h 54m.; 73 plays).
- Vallejo (Spain) (w) – Karjakin (Russia) (b) 1-1 (duration: 3h 21m.; 55 plays).
- Anand (India) (w) – Carlsen (Norway) (b) 1-1 (duration: 2h 46m.; 58 plays).
Final classification of the First Phase:

- Fabiano Caruana: 11 points.
- Levon Aronian: 7 points.
- Magnus Carlsen: 6 points.
- Viswanathan Anand: 5 points.
- Francisco Vallejo: 3 points.
- Sergei Karjakin: 3 points
Sao Paulo. 09/29/2012
Breaking the forecasts that stood Fabiano Caruana as an unlikely winning beat, last night (this early morning in Spain) he consolidated his leadership at the end of the first round of the V Chess Masters Final, which has been held in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo, after five rounds of contest. The second and definitive phase will start on October 8th in Bilbao and will face, in a league of all against all, five of the eight best world chess players.
The confirmation of Caruana as the principal favorite to conquer the Masters Final was consolidated in his last play, in which he played against his closest rival in the standing, the Olymplic champion and No. 2 of the world ranking, Levon Aronian, a play which ended up draw. Identical results were seen in the  other two plays which matched on the one hand, the world champion, Viswanathan Anand and the No. 1 of the world ranking, Magnus Carlsen, and on the other hand, Paco Vallejo versus the Russian Sergei Karjakin.
After this last round in Sao Paulo, the Italian-American will start the second round in Bilbao with 10 points, 4 more points than Aronian and 5 more than Carlsen. In the middle of the classification we can find the world champion, Anand, with 5 points, while Vallejo and Karjakin, both with 3 points, rear the classification, with difficult choices to overcome their results.
Despite the differences accumulated in this first phase of the Final the development of the tournament has been defined by its equality so far, since even if Caruana, Aronian and Anand have ended up undefeated, the latter, the world champion, has finished all his plays tie. In any case, the scoring system applied in the Chess Masters Final, called Bilbao rule, -which grants 3 points  per win- makes it possible for the classification differences not to be that extraordinary. In fact, in the last edition, the Ukranian Vasily Ivanchuk ended Sao Paulo round 3 points ahead of his nearest rival, theAmerican Nakamura, and the tournament was decided on the last day in a tie-breaker play between Ivanchuk and the world No. 1., Magnus carlsen, who ended up winning.
The match played tonight between Caruana and Aronian has been conditioned by the necessity of the Armenian to gain the victory with white pieces in order to approach his rival in the classification. Therefore, he has raised the aggressive and tecnhical english opening, trying to play by the advantage from the vert beginning. The italian has not felt daunted and has raised an equal battle, using the most aggresive defense allowed by back pieces.
In this struggle in the brink, Caruana has assessed the position wrongly and over confidently, while trying to fight for the initiative, he has made a severe mistake which has put him in clear inferiority. Nevertheless, Levon Aronian has played away from his usual talent and even if he has tried to win until the clock was stating 14 seconds left, the match has ended up tie.
The morbid duel between the No.1 of the ranking, Carlsen, and the world champion, Anand, has ended up tie too. As it happened in the previous four rounds, the indian champion has raised a strong opening and has tried to drive the game to a fast tie. However, Carlsen has declined this approach, getting a light advantage which has not been anough to gain the game, due to the accuracy in Anand?s performance. As a curiosity, the game has been played to the end, finishing with the two single kings on the board, a very rare circumstance among elite players.
In the duel faced between the last two classifieds, Spanish Francisco Vallejo and russian Sergei Karjakin, the black pieces have sought the tie from the very beginning through a Berlines opening, which in soccer terms can be analogous to catenaccio. Vallejo has declined this approach and his proposal has been a more active play, trying to maintain the maximum possible pieces on the board. Nevertheless, through his ability, Karjakin has managed to change some of the pieces, developing the play to a calmer outcome. The critical point in the duel occurred when the aggressive game of the player from Menorca has resulted in the gain of a pawn in exchange of a more active play. “At that point” said Vallejo, “I have realized that I should play for the tie and I have committed some kind of inaccuracies which have taken me to the brink of the defeat. However, I have recovered the accuracy, and despite my problems with time, I have achieved a draw.”
The plays can be followed in live via the tournament official web www.bilbaomasters.com.  Live retransmissions will resume on October 8th, in “La Alhondiga” Bilbao.
For further Information:
Press Office: Group Projection: 944790880
Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

October 2012 FRL

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

official_logo
FIDE publishes October 2012 FIDE Rating List. The list of top players is published at Top lists page of FIDE ratings website. All players can check new ratings at the main page of FIDE ratings website.

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Karpov Poikovsky LIVE!

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

Live chess broadcast powered by ChessBomb and Chessdom

Chess Daily News from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Caruana Takes A Lead To Bilbao

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

Fabiano Caruana will take a 4 point lead into the Bilbao leg of the Chess Masters Final after finishing with a draw against world #2 Lev Aronian.
The Armenian had a strong position against Caruana, but he slipped at crucial stages and failed to t…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

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