Archive for February, 2012

Rex Sinquefield deserves praise for his work in chess

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012


Rex Sinquefield & Missouri Public Education
February 28, 2012

Rex Sinquefield deserves praise for his work in bringing the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis to the Central West End.

An important goal of the Chess Center is to encourage scholastic chess programs, especially in St. Louis Public Schools, in part, because the game has obvious behavioral and cognitive benefits for district students.

Sinquefield has earned plaudits for his chess club efforts. Sinquefield has understandably drawn some harsh criticism for a number of his other ideas on improving schools and government in Missouri.

•?Public schools aren’t happy that he champions school vouchers and the establishment of charter schools.

•?Public school teachers aren’t happy that he pours thousands of dollars into the campaigns of state legislators who embrace his idea of ending teacher tenure.

•?Public school officials aren’t happy with his ideas to replace the state income tax with a huge hike in sales taxes. They predict revenue losses from his “Fair Tax” that would be disastrous for public education.

With all this unhappiness, it comes as no surprise that educators jumped all over Sinquefield when he foolishly linked public schools with the Ku Klux Klan in a recent speech at Lindenwood University. Sinquefield’s presentation included the remark:

“…a long time ago, decades ago, the Ku Klux Klan got together and said: ‘How can we really hurt the African American children permanently? How can we ruin their lives? And what they designed was the public school system.…’”

“Beyond offensive.” That’s how Vic Lenz of the Lindbergh School Board characterized his remarks. Lenz is also president of the Missouri School Board Association and the MSBA is condemning the Klan comments.

“His remarks indicate remarkable hostility toward the public schools in Missouri,” noted Lenz. “Candidates for the legislature or state office should not be accepting campaign contributions from him and should return those they have received.”

If all legislators and candidates for statehouse returned contributions, the dollars would pile up in millions. The Associated Press reports that Sinquefield also has given $2.5 million to Let The Voters Decide, a group which is working to get his idea to abolish the state income tax onto the ballot in November 2012.

School board members across the state are urging residents not to sign petitions to get the so-called Fair Tax onto the ballot. They say Sinquefield’s “Fair Tax” idea is better labeled as a regressive “Everything Tax.”

Read more here.

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

No. 1-Ranked Chess Institute in the Nation Moving to Webster Groves

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012


No. 1-Ranked Chess Institute in the Nation Moving to Webster Groves

The Susan Polgar Institute for Chess Excellence will make Webster University its new home after five years at Texas Tech University.

By Carlos Restrepo
Email the author
5:55 am

Susan Polgar, world and Olympiad champion of chess, will move her Susan Polgar Institute for Chess Excellence (SPICE) from Texas Tech University to Webster University, effective June 1.

Polgar was recruited by Texas Tech in 2007 to lead the new SPICE chess institute. However, Polgar said the university there did not have the resources to sustain the fast-growing chess program.

“The program grew very fast,” said Polgar, who is a winner of four world chess championships and five Olympic gold medals. “We are very thankful for our partnership with Texas Tech. We had many great accomplishments there, but it was time to move on.”

Julian Schuster, provost of Webster University, said he has been playing chess for most of his life and has befriended several professional chess players throughout his career in academia. Schuster said a friend had told him that Polgar was planning on leaving Texas Tech, so he saw an opportunity for Webster.

“All my life I’ve thought chess is a great educational tool,” Schuster said. “I always have had an idea to form a chess club, but never sought the opportunity. When one my friends told me Susan Polgar was contemplating leaving Texas, I put two and two together and moved the initiative forward with the university.”

In addition to Polgar, 10 students from Texas Tech, who are part of the chess institute’s “A” team, will also relocate to Webster. At least six of them will receive full-ride scholarships to attend their new home campus, Schuster said.

Schuster said he is not sure of the total cost to the university for bringing the SPICE institute, Polgar and the 10 students to Webster. Schuster said he sees it as a good investment.

“Everyone — the New York Times, the other newspapers — ask me this question, ‘How much will it cost?’” Schuster said. “This is not important. What’s more important is how many direct and indirect benefits this will have for Webster University, Webster Groves, St. Louis, Missouri and even the United States. We are convinced that we will emerge as one of the best universities and we will become an attractive place for the best students to come and to join us. In that regard, it will put Webster Groves on the world map.”

Polgar said it may be difficult to adapt from being at a large university such as Texas Tech, with a population of about 32,000, to Webster University, which has an enrollment of about 4,500 students. However, Polgar said Webster’s campuses abroad and its global mission are a perfect fit for her program.

“Chess is an international game, and anyone can play it,” Polgar said. “We hope to attract students from other countries to come to Webster.”

Both Polgar and Schuster said the institute will serve not only students at the university, but also residents of Webster Groves and surrounding areas.

“We still have to iron-out the details, but there will be opportunities to make it accessible to anyone interested in chess,” Polgar said. “That’s the beauty of chess; it is available to everyone. It doesn’t matter how tall you are, how old you are, how fast you are, what background you come from, it’s available and accessible to everybody. And it will be that way at Webster, too.”

Source: http://webstergroves.patch.com

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

March 2012 FIDE Rating List

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

official_logo
FIDE publishes March 2012 FIDE Rating List. The list of top players is published at dedicated page of FIDE ratings website. All players can check new ratings at the main page of FIDE ratings website or download TXT version from downloads page.

Source: World Chess Federation – FIDE

Commission for Women’s Chess to hold Internet Based FIDE Arbiters’ Seminars

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

FIDEThe Commission for Women’s Chess is going to organize two Internet Based FIDE Arbiters’ Seminars. Both Seminars will give FIDE Arbiter norms, according to the Regulations for the titles of the Arbiters.

The Technical Organizer will be WGM Martha Fierro.

The 14th Internet Based Seminar will take place from 13th to 18th March 2012. The Lecturer will be IA Santiago Garcia Ramos (MEX), FIDE Lecturer, and the lectures will be conducted in Spanish language.

The 15th Internet Based Seminar will take place from 23rd to 30th April 2012. The Lecturer will be IA Panagiotis Nikolopoulos (GRE), Chairman of the FIDE Arbiters’ Commission and FIDE Lecturer. The lectures will be in English language.

For more detailed information please contact:
WGM Martha Fierro, fierromartha(at)yahoo.com

IA Panagiotis Nikolopoulos
Chairman
FIDE Arbiters Commission

Chessdom

6th Georgy Agzamov Memorial in Tashkent, Uzbekistan

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

The 6th International Chess Tournament, dedicated to the memory of Georgy Agzamov, the first grandmaster of Uzbekistan, will be held in Tashkent from March 5th (arrival) till March 15th (departure).

Registration will take place on March 5th, 2012 from 10.00 at the playing venue in the building of the Republican Chess Club (Pakhtakor stadium). The official hotel of the tournament is “Shodlik Palace”.

The general management organization of the competition is carried out by the Chess Federation of Uzbekistan, in cooperation with the Ministry of Culture and Sports of Uzbekistan.

The Tournament is a 9-round Swiss. Last year champion was GM Tigran L Petrosian from Armenia. Players list bellow.

Uzbekistan Chess

Uzbekistan Chess

The general prize fund is 20 000 US dollars

1st place – 5 000 US dollars
2nd place – 3 500 US dollars
3rd place – 2 500 US dollars
4th place – 2 000 US dollars
5th place – 1 500 US dollars
6th place – 1 000 US dollars
7th place – 750 US dollars
8th place – 500 US dollars
9th place – 300 US dollars
10th place – 250 US dollars
11th place – 250 US dollars
12th place – 250 US dollars
Total: 17 800 US dollars

Special prizes:

Women, if not less than 10 participants:
1st place – 500 US dollars
2nd place – 300 US dollars
3rd place – 200 US dollars
Total: 1000 US dollars

Juniors under 20:
1st place – 300 US dollars
2nd place – 200 US dollars
3rd place – 100 US dollars
Total: 600 US dollars

Veterans:
1st place – 300 US dollars
2nd place – 200 US dollars
3rd place – 100 US dollars
Total: 600 US dollars

Grand total: 20 000 US dollars

Website: www.uzchess.uz

Players list:

1. Grachev Boris (Russia) – GM 2693
2. Azarov Sergei (Belarus) – GM 2667
3. Iordachescu Viorel (Moldova) – GM 2651
4. Turov Maxim (Russia) – GM 2645
5. Filippov Anton (Uzbekistan) – GM 2637
6. Guseinov Gadir (Azerbaijan) – GM 2634
7. Mchedlishvili Mikheil (Georgia) – GM 2631
8. Solodovnichenko Yuriy (Ukraine) – GM 2613
9. Kotsur Pavel (Kazakhstan) – GM 2589
10. Golod Vitali (Israel) – GM 2570
11. Megaranto Susanto (Indonesia) – GM 2528
12. Kvon Andrey (Uzbekistan) – IM 2493
13. Khusnutdinov Rustam (Kazakhstan) – GM 2492
14. Dzhumaev Marat (Uzbekistan) – GM 2481
15. Ismagambetov Anuar (Kazakhstan) – GM 2476
16. Potapov Pavel (Russia) – IM 2468
17. Khamrakulov Dzhurabek (Uzbekistan) – IM 2452
18. Vakhidov Jahongir (Uzbekistan) – IM 2419
19. Atabayev Yusup (Turkmenistan) – FM 2413
20. Egin Vladimir (Uzbekistan) – IM 2412
21. Annageldyev Orazly (Turkmenistan) – GM 2396
22. Saidov Beqali (Uzbekistan) – FM 2389
23. Djuraev Sokhib (Tajikistan) – FM 2377
24. Ziatdinov Raset (USA) – GM 2368
25. Akkozov Berik (Kazakhstan) – FM 2363
26. Holmirzaev Bahodir (Uzbekistan) – FM 2363
27. Atabayev Maksat (Turkmenistan) – FM 2336
28. Kasyan Aleksandr (Uzbekistan) – FM 2336
29. Silapov Azat (Turkmenistan) – FM 2336
30. Karimov Ibragim (Uzbekistan) – FM 2333
31. Pak Yevgeniy (Kazakhstan) – 2328
32. Muminova Nafisa (Uzbekistan) – WIM 2327
33. Temirov Bakhyt (Kazakhstan) – 2322
34. Khoroshev Nikita (Uzbekistan) – FM 2318
35. Faizulaev Akmal (Uzbekistan) – FM 2310
36. Alikulov Elbek (Uzbekistan) – FM 2302
37. Artemenko Oleg (Uzbekistan) – FM 2298
38. Gubaydulin Talgat (Uzbekistan) – FM 2296
39. Esenov Annaberdi (Turkmenistan) – FM 2287
40. Nakhbayeva Guliskhan (Kazakhstan) – WIM 2284
41. Daurimbetov A (Uzbekistan) – 2276
42. Farid Firman Syah (Indonesia) – CM 2251
43. Anarkulov Alisher (Uzbekistan) – 2241
44. Tillyaev Ulugbek (Uzbekistan) – 2225
45. Primbetov Kazbek (Kazakhstan) – 2220
46. Turaev Halim (Uzbekistan) – 2214
47. Niyazmetov Ruslan (Uzbekistan) – 2207
48. Rustamov Alisher (Uzbekistan) – 2205
49. Vladimirov Vladimir (Uzbekistan) – 2203
50. Aripov Iskandar (Uzbekistan) – 2197
51. Nodirjanova Nodira (Uzbekistan) – WIM 2195
52. Ulkhanov Azamat (Kazakhstan) – 2191
53. Saduakassova Dinara (Kazakhstan) – WIM 2191
54. Tokhirjanova Hulkar (Uzbekistan) – WFM 2190
55. Golubev Roman (Uzbekistan) – 2190
56. Khailaev Mamatkul (Uzbekistan) – 2185
57. Galyamov Vildan (Uzbekistan) – 2184
58. Kurbonboeva Sarvinoz (Uzbekistan) – 2182
59. Saiyn Zhanat (Kazakhstan) – 2181
60. Sabirova Olga (Uzbekistan) – WIM 2172
61. Annaberdiyev Serdar (Turkmenistan) – 2171
62. Akhmetov Ayan (Kazakhstan) – 2165
63. Eminov Adkham (Uzbekistan) – 2165
64. Gevorgyan Irina (Uzbekistan) – WFM 2155
65. Sultanov Izzatilla (Uzbekistan) – 2154
66. Hamrakulova Yulduz (Uzbekistan) – WIM 2150
67. Ismailov Mukhit (Kazakhstan) – 2133
68. Haylaev Anvar (Uzbekistan) – 2129
69. Fedyashin Sergey (Uzbekistan) – 2127
70. Sattarov Bobur (Uzbekistan) – 2114
71. Begmuratov Alisher (Uzbekistan) – 2095
72. Baymuradova Sevara (Uzbekistan) – 2086
73. Nakyp Rakhimjan (Kazakhstan) – 2085
74. Li Georgiy (Uzbekistan) – 2081
75. Atabayev Saparmyrat (Turkmenistan) – 2065
76. Rahman Adel (Uzbekistan) – 2061
77. Aliyev Kosim (Uzbekistan) – 2051
78. Nazarov Rustem (Turkmenistan) – 2048
79. Mamatkulova Maftuna (Uzbekistan) – 2039
80. Gadoev Timur (Tajikistan) – 2017
81. Esonboeva Gulruhsor (Uzbekistan) – 1998
82. Bayramsahedov Rovshen (Turkmenistan) – 1987
83. Veliyev Serdar (Turkmenistan) – 1986
84. Khudoykulov Nuriddin (Uzbekistan) – 1983
85. Jelsen Yemi (Indonesia) – 1974
86. Abdullaev Mumin (Uzbekistan) – 1958
87. Mallawarachchi T.S. (Sri Lanka) – 1954
88. Solomatin Sergey (Kazakhstan) – 1947
89. Igonin Temur (Uzbekistan) – 1936
90. Khaitov Akmal (Uzbekistan) – 1924
91. Nigmatov Ortik (Uzbekistan) – 1912
92. Abdusattorov Nodirbek (Uzbekistan) – 1907
93. Antonova Nadezhda (Tajikistan) – WFM 1904
94. Jumanov Elbek (Uzbekistan) – 1895
95. Tohirjonova Gulruhbegim (Uzbekistan) – 1885
96. Ilyashev Yerzhan (Kazakhstan) – 1882
97. Yakubboev Nodirbek (Uzbekistan) – 1852
98. Nuritdinov Nizomiddin (Uzbekistan) – 1849
99. Saydaliev Saidakbar (Uzbekistan) – 1840
100. Chan Naruna (Russia) – 1835
101. Shavdirov Jahongir (Uzbekistan) – 1832
102. Annageldiyev Ashirgeldi (Turkmenistan) – 1816
103. Vakhidov Shamsiddin (Uzbekistan) – 1693
104. Shavdirov Jamal (Uzbekistan) – 1629
105. Mamyrbay Assad (Kazakhstan) – 1482
106. Annageldiyev Azatgeldi (Turkmenistan)
107. Byashimov Berdi (Turkmenistan)
108. Hafiz Arif Abdul (Indonesia) – FM
109. Hanik Dwi Nurlaili (Indonesia)
110. Hasanov Temurbek (Uzbekistan)
111. Iskichekova Nadejda (Kazakhstan)
112. Karshiev Umid (Uzbekistan)
113. Kamalov Jaxangir (Uzbekistan)
114. Meredov Shanepes (Turkmenistan)
115. Myradov Soltan (Turkmenistan)
116. Oljobay Alisa (Kyrgyzstan)
117. Oljobay Evr (Kyrgyzstan)
118. Yuldashev Elaman (Kazakhstan)

Chessdom

Your game commented by a 2700 club Grandmaster

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012


Your game commented by a 2700 club Grandmaster

Have you ever imagined to play tennis and your match to be analyzed by Nadal, Federer or Djokovic? Have you ever imagined to play soccer and your special maneuvers to be commented by Cristiano Ronaldo and Messi?

In tennis and soccer such a service is not available yet, but it just got established into the chess world! The team of Chess Evolution, authors of the premium chess book, launch a brand new service for the chess fans where now it is possible to have your chess game analyzed with the personal commentary of the 2700 club players!

The team is headed by GM Arkadij Naiditsch, GM Etienne Bacrot, GM Jobava Baadur, GM Borki Perdojevic, GM Kamil Miton, and GM Sebastien Maze and they are now ready to embark on analyzing your games. It is an additional service to the interactive questions that was launched just a week ago in the chess shop.

GM Naiditsch comments, “This is a combination of a chess lesson and a practical training. From your best game you can learn not only your strengths, but also your weaknesses. It is easy to find out on what openings you have to concentrate, do you need to work out on your positional play or tactics. Very often people do not realize they are just a step from a quality jump in their game and I will be happy to help them in this task.”

Click here to order your commented game

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Commission for Women’s Chess to hold Internet Based FIDE Arbiters’ Seminars

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012


Commission for Women’s Chess to hold Internet Based FIDE Arbiters’ Seminars

The Commission for Women’s Chess is going to organize two Internet Based FIDE Arbiters’ Seminars. Both Seminars will give FIDE Arbiter norms, according to the Regulations for the titles of the Arbiters.

The Technical Organizer will be IM / WGM Martha Fierro.

The 14th Internet Based Seminar will take place from 13th to 18th March 2012. The Lecturer will be IA Santiago Garcia Ramos (MEX), FIDE Lecturer, and the lectures will be conducted in Spanish language.

The 15th Internet Based Seminar will take place from 23rd to 30th April 2012. The Lecturer will be IA Panagiotis Nikolopoulos (GRE), Chairman of the FIDE Arbiters’ Commission and FIDE Lecturer. The lectures will be in English language.

For more detailed information please contact:
WGM Martha Fierro, fierromartha(at)yahoo.com

IA Panagiotis Nikolopoulos
Chairman
FIDE Arbiters Commission

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

6th Georgy Agzamov Memorial in Tashkent, Uzbekistan

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012


6th Georgy Agzamov Memorial in Tashkent, Uzbekistan

The 6th International Chess Tournament, dedicated to the memory of Georgy Agzamov, the first grandmaster of Uzbekistan, will be held in Tashkent from March 5th (arrival) till March 15th (departure).

Registration will take place on March 5th, 2012 from 10.00 at the playing venue in the building of the Republican Chess Club (Pakhtakor stadium). The official hotel of the tournament is “Shodlik Palace”.

The general management organization of the competition is carried out by the Chess Federation of Uzbekistan, in cooperation with the Ministry of Culture and Sports of Uzbekistan.

The Tournament is a 9-round Swiss. Last year champion was GM Tigran L Petrosian from Armenia. Players list bellow.

The general prize fund is 20 000 US dollars

1st place – 5 000 US dollars
2nd place – 3 500 US dollars
3rd place – 2 500 US dollars
4th place – 2 000 US dollars
5th place – 1 500 US dollars
6th place – 1 000 US dollars
7th place – 750 US dollars
8th place – 500 US dollars
9th place – 300 US dollars
10th place – 250 US dollars
11th place – 250 US dollars
12th place – 250 US dollars
Total: 17 800 US dollars

Special prizes:

Women, if not less than 10 participants:
1st place – 500 US dollars
2nd place – 300 US dollars
3rd place – 200 US dollars
Total: 1000 US dollars

Juniors under 20:
1st place – 300 US dollars
2nd place – 200 US dollars
3rd place – 100 US dollars
Total: 600 US dollars

Veterans:
1st place – 300 US dollars
2nd place – 200 US dollars
3rd place – 100 US dollars
Total: 600 US dollars

Grand total: 20 000 US dollars

Website: www.uzchess.uz

Players list:

1. Grachev Boris (Russia) – GM 2693
2. Azarov Sergei (Belarus) – GM 2667
3. Iordachescu Viorel (Moldova) – GM 2651
4. Turov Maxim (Russia) – GM 2645
5. Filippov Anton (Uzbekistan) – GM 2637
6. Guseinov Gadir (Azerbaijan) – GM 2634
7. Mchedlishvili Mikheil (Georgia) – GM 2631
8. Solodovnichenko Yuriy (Ukraine) – GM 2613
9. Kotsur Pavel (Kazakhstan) – GM 2589
10. Golod Vitali (Israel) – GM 2570
11. Megaranto Susanto (Indonesia) – GM 2528
12. Kvon Andrey (Uzbekistan) – IM 2493
13. Khusnutdinov Rustam (Kazakhstan) – GM 2492
14. Dzhumaev Marat (Uzbekistan) – GM 2481
15. Ismagambetov Anuar (Kazakhstan) – GM 2476

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Chess’ greatest challenge: girls

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012


Chess’ greatest challenge: girls
The Virginian-Pilot
By Lisa Suhay

In the world of chess, boys are always in, but U.S. Chess Federation numbers confirm girls are out the minute they hit the teens. Where is Heidi Klum when girls need her most? We need the fashion-forward players as model minds to keep girls in the game of chess rather than dropping out in droves as they reach puberty.

In fact, overall, chess is crying out for a fashion edit.

Of the 700 million chess players worldwide, 45 million are Americans. Half of those are children. Next Saturday, National Chess Day, will be a sad reminder that teen girls are losing an opportunity for a life map to critical thinking and scholarships.

We don’t have to lose girl players to the Terrible Ts: Twitter, Twilight and tween angst. We can change the approach for girls and decrease their hasty exit.

Not surprisingly, of the 1,100 International Grandmasters in the world, only two dozen are women. The United States has only one – Susan Polgar, who is Hungarian-born and naturalized. Only 1 percent of the U.S. Chess Federation’s adult membership is female.

Despite the fact that Heidi Klum, Christina Ricci, Sandra Bullock, Salma Hayak and Madonna all play, the stereotypical public image of chess is still one of stuffy exclusivity, populated by disheveled, older men with seriously quirky natures.

As an official IOC Olympic sport, chess makes curling look sexy.

It’s a team sport. In high school, a student can letter in chess. As Norfolk’s new superintendent of schools, Richard Bentley, embarks on the creation of a state chess league that will make that possible for students here, statistics show we will see those letters mainly on boys’ jackets.

But after attending the five-day Susan Polgar Foundation Girls’ Invitational in Lubbock, Texas, and staying in the dorms with the girls, I now have a better handle on how to help our girls here.

In five sleepless nights as I sat in the hallways packed with boards, clocks and girls ages five to 18, breathing in the scent of nail polish remover, I learned a lot about little girls who can tear you up on the 64 squares while painting their toenails ice blue, listening to an iPod, texting, singing, giggling, gossiping and munching apple chips.

It is both a humbling and mildly terrifying experience to have an adorable 6-year-old girl multitask and checkmate you into oblivion. Which I suspect is the reason behind the programs by the American Association of University Women, the Carnegie Center and others to get girls into science, technology, engineering and math. Ladies, we need to talk. Let’s do coffee across a chess board and I think we can fix all our problems.

Even at the tournament, the girls were relaxed, happy and exchanging little tokens of esteem, very unlike the mixed boy/girl tournaments I have seen over the years where you can cut the gender anxiety and head-games with a battle ax.

If chess is going to be redesigned to be more girl-friendly, as experts like Dr. Alexey Root have suggested, it should start with non-rated girls’ tournaments. Rating tournaments merely encourages a toddlers-in-tiaras-worthy conflict of superior and inferior labels. Girls don’t need more labels. They’re already coping with body-image hate, acne and boys.

To keep girls in, we need to focus on the game. To bring more boys and girls from our state into the game and build their critical-thinking skills, focus and life strategies, a group of community partners has formed, including: the NPS’ superintendent, the Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk State and Old Dominion universities, teachers, parents, The Virginian-Pilot and the Carnegie Math and Science Initiative for Girls. The group is called the Norfolk Initiative for Chess Excellence. That means we are N.I.C.E.

When people come to Norfolk, we will teach them to play the N.I.C.E. way, starting March 2-3 at Virginia’s first-ever all-girl state chess championship. All Virginia girls ages 5-18 can enter for free, rated or unrated, and play for scholarships. And we will give a free chess-in-education seminar for teachers while the girls play.

We are going to send fun, free, unrated, rewarding chess down the runway and see how it scores.

NICE chess: http://www.nicechess.net/

Source: http://hamptonroads.com

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

New blog by super GM Liem

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Vietnamese chess star publishes weekly blog on TuoiTreNews
Updated : Wed, February 29, 2012,9:32 AM (GMT+0700)

Starting this week, Vietnamese grandmaster Le Quang Liem will have his English blog entries published on TuoiTreNews’s new section “Blog Le Quang Liem” on our Sports News page: http://www.tuoitrenews.vn/cmlink/tuoitrenews/sports

The entries, all written by Liem in English, will share the chess talent’s thoughts and feelings from the course of his career with his fans.

Every Saturday, Vietnam’s number 1 chess player will send his entry in Vietnamese to newswire Tuoi Tre Online (www.tuoitre.vn), and an English version to TuoiTreNews, sharing with readers his chess-related stories, and his memories and views about sports and life.

Inaugurating this new section is his latest piece of writing, reflecting his thoughts about the simultaneous chess game in Ho Chi Minh City last Wednesday preceding the HD Bank International Open Chess Tournament.

The Vietnamese version of his blog entry can be read at: http://tuoitre.vn/tag/index.html?t=%27Blog%2bL%C3%AA%2bQuang%2bLi%C3%AAm%27

Remembering my childhood

>> Read in Vietnamese

On the sidelines of the press briefing ahead of the HD Bank International Open Chess tournament’s in Ho Chi Minh City last Wednesday, I joined in the simultaneous chess event, and played with fans. It was really a very enjoyable challenge, although it is still quite new and has been only organized a few times in Vietnam.

Simultaneous Chess is a game in which a player plays against various opponents. This kind of exhibition is pretty popular throughout the chess world. Fans take their seats with chess boards in front of them, while the main player has to move from board to board, and makes his moves with each walking turn.

Simultaneous Chess is even regarded as a Guinness world record. Over the last few years, many chess players from around the world have broken records in this kind of event. The latest attempt was made by an Iranian grandmaster in February 2010 — Ghaem Maghami played simultaneously against 604 competitors (over half of them were adults).

The multiple games lasted for 25 hours, with the grandmaster winning 580 games, drawing 16 and losing 8 games (97.35 percent), which broke the previous world record of an Israeli grandmaster, who played agains 523 opponents. In these events one might have to walk more than half a kilometer each turn only to make a move on all boards. Therefore, these record-breaking attempts require months of serious preparation , especially in terms of physical health, in order to be ready for the extremely long chess games.

Apart from the detail mentioned above, simultaneous chess is often organized as a friendly activity, where it can build up new relationships and also offer an interesting playing-field for those sharing the same hobby. It can help popularize the game of chess as well.

At the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) in Hyderabad (India) in August 2010, World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand played simultaneous games against 40 mathematicians in more than three hours. Other grandmasters from all over the world have also played simuls many times, normally versus 20 to 30 opponents, with the main intention of sharing experience with other chess enthusiasts.

liem
In this photo, I was playing a simul with 20 fans

Back to the event that I attended, I played a simul on 20 chessboards. The number of opponents was not great, but my task was not easy in any way. Walking many rounds is an energy-consuming activity, and you cannot concentrate on the games as intensively as you usually do; moreover, the average time spent for each board is also limited. These are the objective difficulties for anyone who is willing to play Simultaneous Chess.

After nearly two hours, all the games finished. I was pleased to see the other players happy and joyful. Some people who are interested in chess also talked to me and we exchanged a few ideas on the methods to study and perform better in chess tournaments.

Looking at the young players concentrating on each move, I felt like I was looking at myself more than 10 years ago, when I was just getting acquainted with this mental sport. I always hope that with strong passion and determination to study and work on chess seriously, these young players can improve their skills quickly. They will continue to achieve more and more successes and devote their enthusiasm to chess development in Vietnam.

Written by Le Quang Liem

Source: http://www.tuoitrenews.vn

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

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