Archive for April, 2011

Chess improvement video

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

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Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Chess trivia

Saturday, April 30th, 2011


Can you name these two players?

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Saturday chess challenge

Saturday, April 30th, 2011


White to move. How should white proceed? (No computer analysis please)

3r1r2/nB1n1p2/3Q3p/4Pkp1/p4b2/1p5P/5p1P/3R1K2 w – - 0 1

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Chess improvement video

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

Presented by OnlineChessLessons.net

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

4NCL, US Championship and IM Title for Yang-Fan Zhou – Final

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

IM Malcolm Pein looks forward to the final weekend of 4NCL Chess, Gata Kamsky’s US Championship Title and the IM title for rising UK star Yang-Fan Zhou.

Source: The Week in Chess

Yang-Fan Zhou breaks English international master drought

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

England used to produce one or two teenage international masters a year in the 1970s and 1980s, the golden era when the Olympiad team advanced to world No2 behind the Soviet Union. Now Russia and India lead in junior chess while, since David Howell became a grandmaster in 2007, the only new English GMs and IMs have been adults. Yang-Fan Zhou, 16, broke the drought last week when he scored his final IM norm at Coulsdon. It followed Zhou’s eye-catching 9/9 at Brighton in February and the International Chess Federation (Fide) should formally award him his IM title in a few weeks’ time. The sixth-former from Whitgift School in Croydon has made an 80-point surge up the world chess ratings, reflecting …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

TCEC S3 Stage 1 LIVE

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

Live chess broadcast powered by ChessBomb and Chessdom

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Yang-Fan Zhou is England’s newest IM

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

Yang-Fan Zhou breaks English international master drought
  • Leonard Barden
  • The Guardian, Saturday 30 April 2011

England used to produce one or two teenage international masters a year in the 1970s and 1980s, the golden era when the Olympiad team advanced to world No2 behind the Soviet Union. Now Russia and India lead in junior chess while, since David Howell became a grandmaster in 2007, the only new English GMs and IMs have been adults.

Yang-Fan Zhou, 16, broke the drought last week when he scored his final IM norm at Coulsdon. It followed Zhou’s eye-catching 9/9 at Brighton in February and the International Chess Federation (Fide) should formally award him his IM title in a few weeks’ time. The sixth-former from Whitgift School in Croydon has made an 80-point surge up the world ratings, reflecting his growing maturity and confidence, a sharper opening repertoire and a series of attacking wins.

The new IM has a chance for his first GM norm this weekend when the final rounds of 4NCL UK league matches are staged at Hinckley, Leicester. Monday’s Pride & Prejudice v Wood Green clash between two unbeaten teams will settle who wins the national team title.

Zhou’s 4NCL performance so far is around 2560, well ahead of the IM 2450 mark and close to the 2600 GM level. His key game is in tomorrow’s penultimate round when Zhou’s e2e4.org team is paired with Pride & Prejudice, for whom the England No1, Michael Adams, often plays top board.

In the 1970s a talented generation of English juniors was inspired by the advance of Tony Miles and Nigel Short. England’s current schoolboy elite is much smaller but a handful in their mid-teens plus Hendon’s fast improving Isaac Sanders,12, have the potential to follow Zhou to the high echelons of adult chess.

More here.

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Plan backfire?

Saturday, April 30th, 2011


Hosting European women’s chess championships may backfire a bit on home turf
2011-04-30 14:39:43
by Yi Gaochao

TBILISI, April 30 (Xinhua) — Feelings toward the board game of chess among Georgian women are as split as generation gaps between grandmothers and granddaughters.

The generation-asunder feelings are once more brought forth by the incoming of the 2011 European Individual Women Chess Championship and the 2011 European Individual Women Rapid Chess Championship to the threshold of the South Caucasus country. Georgia is hosting the two events one after the other in early and mid-May.

For the old-timers, chess for women is reminiscent of a Georgian glory, though under the flag of the then Soviet Union. Between 1961 and 1991, two Georgian women reigned the international chess scene for women with 10 successive world championship titles spanning the entire three decades.

For the newcomers, chess for the weaker sex set off the jinx and jitters for them to break through so as to equal even part of the 1961-1991 Georgian glory.

First Nona Gaprindashvili and then Maia Chiburdanidze made their fame not only for reigning the world for three decades but also for being the world’s first and second women to gain the title of grandmaster for their expertise and excellence in the game.

Their fame soon spilled out of the chess board. Gaprindashvili has a perfume named after her, with a Tbilisi factory churning out Gaprindashvili perfume in bottles shaped like the chess piece of Queen. Chiburdanidze has several commemorative postage stamps minted for her including a 1986 one by Mongolia to depict one of her famous moves in the world championship games.

Be it the dissolution of the former Soviet Union or the political and economic ups and downs, Georgia has experienced 20 years of oblivion through a drought of medals of any hue in women chess actions.

Gia Giorgadze, president of the Georgian Chess Federation, said while explaining the backstep: “Speaking on this setback we have to take into account one important circumstance such as a painful process of changing of generations.”

The absence of Chiburdanidze from the Georgian squad led to a below-par performance at last year’s Chess Olympiad as against the Chiburdanidze-paced Georgian team for the previous Chess Olympiad.

Yet such young talents as Salome Melia and Bella Khotenashvili produced some brow-lifting performances at the last Chess Olympiad held in Russia.

Spearheaded by top-seeded Nana Dzagnidze, the Georgian trio are expected by compatriot chess lovers and admirers to revive to some extent and even to restore to the full the Georgian glory in women chess games by making the most of their home advantage.

But chess pundits in Georgia cannot be just too optimistic, in that Georgia enters this year’s European championship with none who has ever taken any medal from the annual event which was inaugurated in 2000 in the Georgian Black Sea resort of Batumi. The Georgians took two bronze medals from the 2000 and 2001 championships but these medallists do not play this year.

The upcoming young Georgian women chess players will face strong rivals as two-time continental champions Pia Cramling from Sweden (2003 and 2010), Tatiana Kosintseva of Russia (2007 and 2009) and Kateryna Lahno of Ukraine (2005 and 2008).

If they truly want to triumph on home turf, the Georgian women chess players, especially the leading trio, will have to beat their own nerves and nerds first before they can hope to beat their opponents en route to taking their first European medals after a hiatus of a full decade.

Source: http://news.xinhuanet.com

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Ken Rogoff: Economic Guru

Saturday, April 30th, 2011


I have the highest respect for Ken Rogoff. I think he would be an excellent choice as the Treasury Secretary. Of course I am a little bias :)

Game ‘hard-wired’ into economic guru

Saturday, April 30, 2011 03:06 AM

Ken Rogoff is a 58-year-old economist who chose that field over chess.

His doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1980 launched him on a distinguished career, including positions as chief economist at the International Monetary Fund and a professor at Harvard University.

The author of a column syndicated in 50 countries and 13 languages, he is frequently consulted by political leaders and interviewed by the media.

Although he no longer plays chess competitively, he hasn’t abandoned his early passion for the game. Formerly a precocious and high-ranked American player, he earned the grandmaster title in 1978.

“I think about chess all the time,” he recently told the magazine New in Chess.

“I’m not thinking about it with any depth, but I think part of my brain is hard-wired to play chess. I’ll think about it in boring meetings, … walking along. It’s something I do to relax.”

Rogoff has found his chess experience useful during his career, particularly for maintaining calm in challenging situations – and in negotiations, where chess taught him “to think about what the other person is thinking in a very disciplined way.”

Source: http://www.dispatch.com

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

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