Archive for October, 2010

Vachier-Lagrave Wins Unive

Sunday, October 31st, 2010

The young French talent Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (pictured) has won the 14th Unive tournament in Hoogeveen the Netherlands.
It was an excellent result for Maxime, who won the four player double-round robin event with an undefeated score of 4.5/6 ah…

Source: Chess.com – Play. Learn. Share.

SPICE Cup Round 4

Sunday, October 31st, 2010


Here is the link to over 235 pictures from the SPICE Cup 2010.

Round by round pairings: http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2010/10/spice-cup-pairings.html

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Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

9th Cap d’Agde 2010 – Final

Sunday, October 31st, 2010

The 9th Chess encounters Nationales and Internationales of Cap d’Agde (FRA) takes place 22nd – 31st October 2010
Players: Vasily Ivanchuk (2754) UKR ; Hikaru Nakamura (2733) USA ; Xiangzhi Bu (2695) CHN ; Liem Le Quang (2694) VIE ; Judith Polgar (2682) HUN ; Sebastien Feller (2649) FRA ; Romain Edouard (2636) FRA ; Jon Ludvig Hammer (2633) NOR ;
Truong Nguyen Ngoc (2633) VIE ; Anatoly Karpov (2619) RUS ; Yannick Pelletier (2592) SUI ;
Tatiana Kosintseva (2573) RUS ; Nadezhda Kosintseva (2565) RUS ; Kateryna Lahno (2539) UKR ; Zhu Chen (2480) QAT ;
Sophie Milliet (2388) FRA. Time control: 25 minutes + 10″

Source: The Week in Chess

SPICE Cup Round 4 LIVE

Sunday, October 31st, 2010

Live chess broadcast powered by ChessBomb and Chessdom


Here is the link to over 200 pictures from the SPICE Cup 2010.

Round by round pairings: http://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2010/10/spice-cup-pairings.html

LIVE games are also being broadcast on MonRoi.com (http://monroi.com/watch/?tnm_id=1443), playchess.com, TWIC, chess.com, etc.

Round time: 2 pm (Lubbock time)

Time control: 40 moves in 90 minutes + 30 second increment, after 40 moves, players will have an additional 30 minutes + 30 second increment

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Ivanchuk stops the unstoppable Nakamura

Sunday, October 31st, 2010


Nakamura steamrolled nearly every player in the 2010 Cap d’Agde so far. Then he ran into buzz saw Ivanchuk. After winning the first game, Ivanchuk took the sure draw to clinch the title.

V. Ivanchuk – H. Nakamura
Cap d’Agde 2010 – Final game 1

1.e4 e5 2.f4 Nc6 3.Nf3 f5 4.d3 d6 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.g3 g6 7.Bg2 Bg7 8.fxe5 dxe5 9.Bg5 h6 10.Be3 0–0 11.0–0 fxe4 12.dxe4 Be6 13.a3 Kh7 14.Kh1 a6 15.Bg1 Rf7 16.Qe2 Nd4 17.Qd3 Nxf3 18.Qxf3 Rd7 19.Rad1 Bg4 20.Rxd7 Bxf3 21.Rxd8 Bxg2+ 22.Kxg2 Rxd8 23.Be3 g5 24.h3 Kg6 25.g4 c6 26.Rf2 b5 27.Rd2 Rxd2+ 28.Bxd2 Bf8 29.Kf3 h5 30.Ne2 hxg4+ 31.hxg4 Nd7 32.Nc1 c5 33.Na2 Nb8 34.c4 bxc4 35.Nc3 Nc6 36.Nd5 Nd4+ 37.Ke3 Kf7 38.Nb6 Ke6 39.Nxc4 Be7 40.Ba5 Nb5 41.Kd3 Nd6 42.Nxd6 1–0
?
Click here to replay the game.

H. Nakamura – V. Ivanchuk
Cap d’Agde 2010 – Final game 2

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Bc4 Bg7 5.h4 h6 6.d4 d6 7.c3 Nc6 8.0–0 g4 9.Ne1 Qxh4 10.Bxf4 Nf6 11.e5 dxe5 12.dxe5 g3 13.Bxg3 Qxg3 14.exf6 Bf8 15.Nd3 Bd6 16.Qh5 Bg4 17.Bxf7+ Kf8 18.Qg6 Qh2+ 19.Kf2 Qg3+ ?–?
?
Click here to replay the game.

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Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Plenty of Fighting Spirit on Final Day of Pearl Spring

Sunday, October 31st, 2010

Magnus Carlsen of Norway had already clinched first place at the Pearl Spring chess tournament in Nanjing, China, but there was still a lot to play for, so all the games on the final day were hard-fought and two of them were decisive. The most important game of the day, in terms of the standings and the prize money, was between Viswanathan Anand of India, the world chess champion, and Etienne Bacrot of France. They were tied for second place. Anand had White and opened with his d pawn. Bacrot used the Nimo-Indian Defense and achieved a solid position out of the opening, though Anand had the bishop pair ??” a potentially long-term advantage. Bacrot began to play loosely, opening up his …

Source: GameKnot online chess news

Ivanchuk vs. Nakamura LIVE for the title

Sunday, October 31st, 2010

Live chess broadcast powered by ChessBomb and Chessdom


1. e4 e5 2. f4!? Ivanchuk means business today. He’s pulling an unpredictable Nakamura against Nakamura :)

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

A classic chess miniature

Sunday, October 31st, 2010


A classic chess miniature
Posted: October 31, 2010 – 12:23am

Below is a classic chess miniature which took place nearly 400 years ago.

Greco – Amateur

Rome, 1620

The following game was played in the early 17nth century by one of the very first chess theoretician by the name of Greco (as White).

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 In addition to the move played in this game, White’s most popular options are 3.Bb5 (the Ruy Lopez); 3.d4 (the Scotch) or the Four Knight’s game, starting with 3.Nc3.

3.Bc4 This the beginning of the Italian game or Giuoco Piano as it is also called.

3…Bc5 So far both sides were developing their minor pieces (Bishops and Knights) as expected while focusing on controlling the key central squares (d4, d5, e4, e5) at the same time.

4.c3 This move aims to prepare the safe advance of White’s d-Pawn by d2-d4.White could not have played that move immediately as three Black pieces were attacking the d4 square.

4…Qe7 While this move may not objectively be the best, it is a tricky one. If White now proceeds with his plan and plays 5.d4 then after the exchange of Pawn on d4 by 5…exd4 6.cxd4 Black could win a Pawn with 6…Qxe4+ as the Queen has captured the Pawn with a check.

The best move instead is 4…Nf6 when typically the game would continue with 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+.

5.0–0 d6 6.d4 Bb6 Here Black no longer can win a Pawn on e4 by 6…exd4 7.cxd4 Qxe4 as White would pin and win Black’s Queen after 8.Re1.

7.Bg5 f6 While this move gains time as it attacks White’s Bishop at the same time it makes it difficult for Black to castle to the King’s side in the near future. 7…Nf6 may have been a safer choice, although putting the Knight voluntarily into a pin is not that appealing either.

8.Bh4 I would have preferred 8.Be3.

8…g5 This unusual early aggression leads to interesting complications.

9.Nxg5 White is going for it! White sacrifices a Knight for two Pawns and an attack. The safer looking 9.Bg3 would give Black initiative after 9…h5 10.h3 h4 11.Bh2 g4 12.hxg4 Bxg4.

9…fxg5 10.Qh5+ This is a key moment. The question is where to go from the check?

10…Kd7 After 10…Kf8 White has a winning attack with 11.f4! gxh4 (or 11…exf4 12.Bxg5 followed by 13.Rxf4+) 12.fxe5+ Kg7 13.Rf7+.

10…Kd8 11.Bxg5 Nf6 12.Qh4 Rf8 is also playable.

11.Bxg5 and this was the point where Black made the decisive mistake.

11…Qg7? 11…Nf6 was the only move to continue the fight, although White would still have compensation for the sacrificed piece after 12.Qh3+ Ke8 13.Qh4; 11…Qe8? on the other hand was bad as would lead to checkmate in two after 12.Qg4+.

And now comes, the brilliant final combination which forces checkmate in three moves.

12.Be6+! Kxe6 13.Qe8+ Nce7 14.d5 Checkmate.

Source: http://lubbockonline.com

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Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Humpy reportedly denied chance to represent India

Sunday, October 31st, 2010


I have been overlooked for the Asian Games: Humpy
PTI, Oct 30, 2010, 06.43pm IST

NEW DELHI: India’s number one ranked women chess player Koneru Humpy on Saturday alleged that she has been overlooked for the upcoming Asian Games in Guangzhou next month.

A day after the All Indian Chess Federation (AICF) announced that world champion Viswanathan Anand and Koneru Humpy have pulled out of the Asian Games, the winner of two gold medals of 2006 Doha Asian Games, Humpy minced no words in saying that given a chance she would have loved to represent India.

“I have not pulled out of Asian Games but denied an entry. I wish the federation could have shown some respect to international players and their prior engagements,” an upset Humpy said.

“Playing for India is always the top most priority and I would have loved to play for country and win a gold medal.

“The Indian Chess Federation wanted me to attend a training camp before the Asian Games but they should have looked at my international commitments and taken my performance into account before rejecting my case,” the world number two added.

Humpy, the highest ranked Indian in the world, has an international rating of 2593 points and is behind Judith Polgar of Hungary.

“All my appeals to the federation have fallen flat and that left me really disappointed. What can I do if the parent chess body is not willing to give a chance to the defending champion?

“I have also written to India’s sports minister MS Gill but I am yet to get a reply,” Humpy said.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

Humpy denied chance to represent India

Sunday, October 31st, 2010


I have been overlooked for the Asian Games: Humpy
PTI, Oct 30, 2010, 06.43pm IST

NEW DELHI: India’s number one ranked women chess player Koneru Humpy on Saturday alleged that she has been overlooked for the upcoming Asian Games in Guangzhou next month.

A day after the All Indian Chess Federation (AICF) announced that world champion Viswanathan Anand and Koneru Humpy have pulled out of the Asian Games, the winner of two gold medals of 2006 Doha Asian Games, Humpy minced no words in saying that given a chance she would have loved to represent India.

“I have not pulled out of Asian Games but denied an entry. I wish the federation could have shown some respect to international players and their prior engagements,” an upset Humpy said.

“Playing for India is always the top most priority and I would have loved to play for country and win a gold medal.

“The Indian Chess Federation wanted me to attend a training camp before the Asian Games but they should have looked at my international commitments and taken my performance into account before rejecting my case,” the world number two added.

Humpy, the highest ranked Indian in the world, has an international rating of 2593 points and is behind Judith Polgar of Hungary.

“All my appeals to the federation have fallen flat and that left me really disappointed. What can I do if the parent chess body is not willing to give a chance to the defending champion?

“I have also written to India’s sports minister MS Gill but I am yet to get a reply,” Humpy said.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

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Chess daily news from Susan Polgar

Source: Susan Polgar Chess Daily News and Information

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